Bhotia

Bhotia

 

a term encompassing several Tibetan-language groups of people of the Himalaya Mountains. The Bhotia live mainly in Sikkim and Nepal, as well as in Ladakh (Kashmir) and several other regions of India. They number about 800,000, but precise data are lacking. Groups of Bhotia are separated by almost impassable mountains, and they speak in different dialects. Most Bhotias are Buddhists, but in India some are Hindus. Their primary occupations are livestock raising (sheep, goats, yaks) and caravan trade.

REFERENCE

Narody Iuzhnoi Azii. Moscow, 1963.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Main Telephone, Exchange, Awash-Vikash, Po Bhotia Parao, Haldwani
Earlier, Bhotia women presented a group dance to add traditional flavour to the opening ceremony.
"The Grading of Sherpa and Bhotia Porters", Himalayan Journal 12.
The research site lies on the northerly border of Hindu ethnicity and caste communities in Nepal, abutting Bhotia (Tibetan-origin) communities to the North, and ensuring residents some of the most marginal cropland in all of Nepal.
Members of Bhotia tribe today depend upon conventional methods for livelihood.
Many of the people north of the Nepali Himalaya are known as bhotia, indicating their Tibetan origins.
Main Telephone Exchange, Ii Floor, Avas Vikas, Po Bhotia Parao, Haldwani
(2) 'A Man of the Frontier' is the story of the life and times of S W Laden La, the Sikkimese Bhotia police officer who was commissioned to establish a police force in Lhasa; 'In the service of his country' is the biography of Dasang Dandul Tsarong who apart from being commander in chief was head of the Tibetan armoury.
A "fairly free sexual life" was also observed among the Bhotia of Sikkim (Nakane 1966).