Kaifeng

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Kaifeng

(kī-fŭng), city (1994 est. pop. 535,300), NE Henan prov., China, on the Longhai RR. It is a commercial, agricultural, and industrial center. Manufactures include agricultural machinery, zinc, textiles, fertilizer, chemicals, and processed foods. The Huang He (Yellow River), just to the north, has frequently flooded the city. Kaifeng has often been a major center of Chinese political and cultural life. Founded in the 3d cent. B.C., it was, as Bianliang, capital of the Five Dynasties (906–59) and then capital of the northern Sung dynasty (960–1127). Zoroastrians worshiped there, and in the 12th cent. a Jewish colony was established. The city fell to the Mongols in the 13th cent. Kaifeng was the provincial capital until superseded (1954) by Zhengzhou.

K’aifeng

 

a city in eastern China, in the province of Honan on the Great China Plain just south of the Huangho. Population, 289, 000 (1959). The city is a transportation junction. Its industries include machine-building, chemicals, textiles (cotton), and food. There are numerous institutions of higher learning. K’ai-feng is one of the oldest cities in the country; from 960 to 1127 it was the imperial capital. The city is laid out in a rectangle, enclosed by a fortified wall with four gates. There are remains of a 12th-century palace and the 13-tier T’ieh-Ta Pagoda (the “Iron Pagoda,” 1041), as well as the Honan provincial museum.

Kaifeng

a city in E China, in N Henan on the Yellow River: one of the oldest cities in China and its capital (as Pien-liang) from 907 to 1126. Pop.: 810 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Interesting intellectually, these voices lack the dramatic character of those depicted in the scroll itself, the facsimile of which graces seventeen pages at the centre of the book, taking us through the "urban realism" of Bianliang. Having met the people in the painting we are lured once again into their world of pagodas and pavilions, carts and mill wheels, high stone balustrades and bamboo poles; we are taken along the river of lanterned tea houses to a landscape of lonely huts and eternal trees.
Then there are Shengjing, Chengdu, Bianliang, Datong and Hangzhou, the five separate palaces of mediocrity, and seven other modest palaces such as Piogyang and Changde (?).
Preserve your ancestral customs and settle in Bianliang (Kaifeng).'" (78)