Biblicist

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Biblicist

, Biblist
1. a biblical scholar
2. a person who takes the Bible literally
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The vapid if rigorous logical virtuosity of the late medieval nominalists, like the proof-texting biblicism of the Reformers, had both turned theology into a mind game, albeit a mind game with ecclesio-political payoffs.
Biblicism, conversionism, and activism transpire from Antin's letters, memoir and immigration propaganda lectures and texts: "biblicism" as a metaphorical code for the interpretation of Antin's life since her Polotzk "exodus" to the "burning bush" Bostonian revelation of Reverend Hale's Unitarian, Universalist Darwinism; "conversionism" as previously explained by Antin, the American rebirth and complete abandonment of Judaism; as well as her missionary "activism" focused on mediating the immigrant experience to the mainstream and vice versa.
As of 2016, she writes, "American evangelicalism can be characterized by its biblicism, nondenominationalism, magnetic leadership, selective adaptation to popular culture, pentecostalization, globalization, ethnic diversification, political realignment, and generational change" (203).
Biblicism: the belief that the Bible is the fundamental, essential authority on religious matters.
Thus, the evangelical faith focuses on the 'good news' of salvation brought to sinners by Jesus Christ." But Evangelicalism can be distinguished more specifically by what historian David Bebbington refers to as "four primary characteristics." These characteristics are as follows: "conversionism, the belief that lives need to be changed; activism, the expression of the gospel in effort; biblicism, a particular regard for the Bible; and 'crucicentrism,' a stress on the sacrifice of Christ on the cross.
He looks, for example, to the minister Elisha Williams's 1744 pamphlet, The Essential Rights and Liberties of Protestants, which gathered texts from the Bible to help establish the "Whig-biblical confluence" that, Noll shows, blended the Biblicism of Protestant sermonizing with the political justification of revolution against the British king.
Trapped in a certain biblicism, they remain unimpressed by the findings of bilateral and multilateral discussions on baptism that have taken place over especially the last 32 years.
Katherine Clay Bassard's essay feeds on black women's biblicism from the nineteenth century to the present to ponder black women's religious agency in Morrison's rendition of Christianity.
(32) For instance, he mentions the difference between the Catholic sacrament (the idea that sacred can be found rather in the realm of things) as opposed to the Evangelical Biblicism (the idea that words, rather than things, are sacred).
'Although not as well-known as John Hus, from certain points of view Peter is more important, and certainly more original, than the great Czech Reformer', insofar as in his radical Biblicism he went far beyond the latter (SPINKA apud MOLNAR, 1947, p.
Many of these novels celebrated the Protestant martyrs under the reign of Mary Tudor, but these eventually evoked narratives of recusants who risked their lives to reject biblicism in favor of the sacramental historical Catholic church, previewing what was to become a "new Counter-Reformation" (143).
His involvement in translation, for example, shows that his life in Tooro and his Protestant biblicism caused him to take different approaches from those of many of his Ganda and missionary peers.