Bibulus

Bibulus

Bibulus (Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus) (bĭbˈyo͝oləs), d. 48 B.C., Roman statesman. The colleague in the consulship with Julius Caesar in 59 B.C., he did everything in his power to block each move made by Caesar. A conservative republican, he was a strong partisan of Pompey. In 51 B.C. he was governor of Syria, and in 48 B.C. he died trying to halt Caesar in the Adriatic. His wife was Portia, daughter of Cato the Younger; she later married Brutus.
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"Pardon me, sir; you are giving a very wrong construction to my language, if you suppose I include, without many and particular qualifications, the bibulus Americanus, in the family of the vacca.
(43) Suetonius (Jul 49) reports that Bibulus, Caesar's co-consul, referred to him in his public edicts as the "queen of Bithynia" who was previously enamored of a king and now of a kingdom.
En primer lugar Bibulus es un cognomen muy poco frecuente --en la Peninsula Iberica solo esta atestiguado en este epigrafe-- que durante el periodo tardorrepublicano monopoliza la familia senatorial de los Calpurnii (18).
When his co-consul Bibulus tried to delay a vote, Caesar had a bucketful of dung dumped over his head.
Yet in the light of the discussion so far, one can hardly fail to recognize Catullus' invective against Caesar and Pompey, the infamous socer generque (29.24), as a political attack, even if the poet's specific objections to the consequences of the two men's conduct need not be assumed to correspond very precisely with the impulses lying behind the denunciations contained in Calpurnius Bibulus' hostile and celebrated edicts.(13) Indeed, apart from the hyperbolically comprehensive perdidistis omnia (29.24), Catullus' extant complaints against Pompey and Caesar tend to focus on the personal luxuria of Caesar's praefectus fabrum, Mamurra.(14)
At the end of 50 Bibulus, Domitius, and Cato were all privati; Postumius was certainly a privatus at the beginning of 49.
When I was that girl's age my head was full of learning Always cloistered in my father's study writing treatises in Latin Letter to Augustinus Aemilius, Curse against the Ornamentation of Women Letter to Bibulus Sempronius, Defense of Their Liberal Instruction How naive I was, copying them out and sending them to scholars As young men do to establish their reputations Only one friar wrote back to me, though I gained some notoriety Here in my native Brescia, and then I was married
The importance of this source of information is confirmed by Bibulus' actions after Caesar had isolated him from political action in 59 B.C.
Milo retaliated through the publication of pamphlets and observing the skies to delay the elections from the 19th to at least the 23rd of November.(70) This marked a return to the methods of Bibulus in 59 B.C.
Others include: Odes 3.28.8 on Bibulus, Odes 1.5.4 on Pyrrha and the jokes on the poet's own name in Epod, 15.12 and Serm.
7.3.5) Cicero refers to Bibulus with the words 'quem ...