Biens Nationaux

Biens Nationaux

 

a term introduced in France during the Great French Revolution and since retained in historical literature to designate both movable and immovable property confiscated by the state. On Nov. 2, 1789, a law was adopted on the confiscation of church lands. On Feb. 9–12, 1792, the property of émigrés was confiscated and put on sale; in October 1793 the same was done with the property of persons who had been executed. At a meeting held from Feb. 26 to Mar. 3, 1794, the National Convention sanctioned the confiscation of the property of all enemies of the revolution and its transfer without compensation to “needy patriots.”

The greater part of these biens nationaux ended up in the hands of the bourgeoisie and the affluent peasantry. During the Restoration, unsold land that had been part of the biens nationaux was returned to former ownership. By a law of Apr. 27, 1825, the owners of all biens nationaux that had been subsequently sold received cash compensation that totaled about 1 billion francs.

References in periodicals archive ?
(10) See Bernard Bodinier- Eric Teyssier, L 'Evenement le plus important de la Revolution : la vente des biens nationaux (Editions du comite des travaux historiques et scientifiques, 2000).
Recueil des textes legislatifs et administratifs concernant les biens nationaux, above, p.
Selon Gribaudi, ce phenomene est aide par la vente des biens nationaux a la suite de la Revolution francaise.
In this regard, the author analyzes with considerable acumen the role played by the biens nationaux in the consolidation of the Revolution among moderate classes and the absorption of the revolutionary heritage into the socialism of the industrial age.
A majority of these installations were sold as biens nationaux, primarily to ironmasters, ironworks leasees, and businessmen.