Bifidobacterium

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Bifidobacterium

[‚bī·fə·dō·bak′tir·ē·əm]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Actinomycetaceae; branched, bifurcated, club-shaped or spatulate rods forming smooth microcolonies; metabolism is saccharoclastic.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Bifidobacteria as indicators of fecal pollution in tropical waters.
"As soon as you drop the Bifidobacteria away with weaning, other bugs sort of take up that space, but they're not necessarily the ones high in AMR," said the senior author of the study and microbiologist David Mills, from the University of California, Davis.
Breastmilk contains lactic acid bacteria like bifidobacteria and lactobacillus, including l.fermentum, and prebiotics containing galactose.
Venketeshwer Rao, M.Sc, Ph.D, professor emeritus at the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, explains in a research that a large number of beneficial bacteria called probiotic bacteria, such as bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria, support good health and the immune system.
Remarkable increase in HDL level was noticed in rats fed on yogurt supplemented with Bifidobacteria (31).
Among the most important and beneficial bacteria of the gut microbiome are those belonging to the group bifidobacteria. (11) Research shows that bifidobacteria have wide-ranging health benefits--they fight allergies, high cholesterol levels, respiratory diseases, stress, and anxiety.
Depletion of Bifidobacteria has also been demonstrated in both fecal and mucosal samples of IBS patients [9, 11-13].
Schott speculates that either the increased numbers of Bifidobacteria are crowding out other inflammation-inducing strains, or that these Bifidobacteria are producing a metabolic byproduct(s) that has positive effects on the host, including supporting healthy joints.
However, the ability to viably grow on HMOs is variable and importantly does not extend to all bifidobacteria! species.
The aim of study was to examine different factors affecting survival and activity of five species of bifidobacteria, study the viability of two chosen Bifidobacterium species in manufactured frozen yogurt under different conditions, and investigate the effect of storage temperatures on their viability.