Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge

Address:1661 W JPG Niblo Rd
Madison, IN 47250

Phone:812-273-0783
Fax:812-273-0786
Web: www.fws.gov/midwest/bigoaks
Established: 2000.
Location:5 miles north of Madison on US Highway 421.
Facilities:Interpretive exhibits, wildlife viewing sites, boat ramp.
Activities:Boating, fishing, hunting, wild food products (mushrooms, nuts, berries, asparagus) may be gathered for personal use, educational programs (by prior arrangement).
Special Features:Refuge contains at least 32 caves, all of which are closed to the public. During a recent survey of the caves and wells on the refuge, researchers discovered 6 previously unknown species of invertebrates.
Habitats: 50,000 acres of grasslands, shrub, forests, and wetlands; 165-acre lake.
Access: Open 10 days per month from mid-April until the end of November; contact refuge office for specific days and times.
Wild life: River otter. Also a broad range of birds (200 species sighted), mammals (39 species), bats, reptiles and amphibians, fish, and butterflies.

See other parks in Indiana.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discovery of populations in southeast (Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge) and extreme south-central (Spencer County) Indiana over the past several years has redefined the perceived range of this species in Indiana.
In March 2003, Daryl Karns, Joseph Robb, Erin Haswell, and others confirmed the presence of a large population of Crawfish Frogs located within Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge (Haswell 2004).
Their recent discovery at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Indiana suggests either that the species has a broader, long-undetected, range in the state, or that animals were introduced into the former Jefferson Proving Grounds (Haswell 2004).
Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge is located at the former Jefferson Proving Grounds.
Northern Crawfish Frogs (Rana areolata circulosa) at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge in Southeastern Indiana.
Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, formerly Jefferson Proving Grounds, is one of Indiana's largest natural areas (approximately 22,000 ha).
The primary function of the use of fire as a management tool at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge is to maintain the grassland habitats by reducing the density of woody vegetation (USFWS 2001).
Maintaining these unique midwestern grasslands is vital to maintain the unique biodiversity at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
Table 1.--Stand table for overstory trees sampled during the summer of 2001 at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge. Frequency = number of plots in which species occurred; density = number of stems/ha; basal area = [m.sup.2]/ha; importance value = (relative density + relative basal area + relative frequency)/3.