Bigger Thomas


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Related to Bigger Thomas: Native Son

Bigger Thomas

possesses a pathological hatred of white people. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Hatred

Bigger Thomas

finds freedom through killing and life’s meaning through death. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Irony
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, Bigger Thomas, though like Styron's Turner in expressing hatred, is a desperate figure for whom "hate and fear" are rarely separate emotions (Wright 374).
Ellis, If We Must Die: From Bigger Thomas to Biggie Smalls (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 2011).
[I]f there had been one person in the Dalton household who viewed Bigger Thomas as a human being, the crime would have been solved in half an hour.
not understandable" and "incommunicable" (London 164-65), Bigger Thomas's development concludes in the same silent entrenchment in which it began--a silence of circumstance reminiscent of Maurice Blanchot's claim in The Space of Literature that the artist cannot separate himself from the world of production (217).
When I read Richard Wright's Native Son, I was fascinated by that incident when Bigger Thomas suffocated Mary Dalton to death, brutally severed her head with a hatchet and threw her body into a blazing furnace.
A REVIEW ESSAY on Richard Wright's Native Son, by Eric Van Hoose, "Native Sun: Lightness and Darkness in Native Son" examines Wright's seminal novel in terms of the symbolic use of these values in the physical environment inhabited by the main character, Bigger Thomas, as well as in his interior, psychological awareness and projection.
After he accepted the bowdlerizing edits of the Book-of-the-Month Club, his Native Son (1940) became a massive bestseller that reflects Wright's encounters with Jews; recall that the novel concludes with the failure of a Jewish lawyer, Boris Max, to offer much salvation or consolation to his African-American client, Bigger Thomas. Jennifer Jensen Wallach's Richard Wright: From Black Boy to World Citizen (Ivan R.
The story of Bigger Thomas is a story of dreams as much as it is a story of survival.
Set in 1930s Chicago, Native Son follows Bigger Thomas, a black man who has grown up amid extreme racial prejudice and persecution all his life, and matured into an utter sociopath.
Nevertheless Castillo remains the obvious next opponent for Hatton, either on June 2 or June 23 in the bigger Thomas and Mack Convention Center.
And the performance of Ato Essandoh as the prototypical angry young black man Bigger Thomas is so violently true to the written original that you walk away from the theater pondering the enduring power of Wright's prophetic, problematic novel.
It deals with murder born out of self-hate and racism as the work burrows deep within the tortured psyche of its main character, Bigger Thomas.