Billie Jean King

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King, Billie Jean,

1943–, American tennis player, b. Long Beach, Calif., as Billie Jean Moffitt. King won 67 tournament titles and 20 Wimbledon titles, including singles in 1966–68, 1972–73, and 1975. She was the U.S. Lawn Tennis women's singles champion in 1967, 1971–72, and 1974. In 1973 she defeated Bobby RiggsRiggs, Bobby
(Robert Larimore Riggs), 1918–95, U.S. tennis player, b. Los Angeles. Playing tennis from the age of 11, Riggs won several tournaments in the 1930s and helped the U.S. team win the Davis Cup in 1938.
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 in a "battle of the sexes." An aggressive, hard-hitting competitor, she turned professional in 1968. Active in the women's rights movement, particularly in the area of equality of wages, she was in the 1970s one of the founders of the Women's Tennis Association and cofounded a magazine, Womensport.

Bibliography

See S. Ware, Game, Set, Match (2011).

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References in periodicals archive ?
Birthdays: Billie-Jean King, left, and Jamie Lee Curtis
Sally Jones' specialist subject tonight is Billie-Jean King
Birthdays: Billie-Jean King, 73; Jamie Lee Curtis, 58
1968 Virginia Wade defeated Billie-Jean King to capture the US Open women's title.
Tied with Billie-Jean King on 20 titles, 49-year-old Navratilova lost in both doubles events yesterday.
Navratilova, 47, still has a chance to break the Wimbledon record of 20 titles held by Billie-Jean King after reaching the semi-finals of the women's doubles.
Martina retired one short of Billie-Jean King's record of 20 Wimbledon titles, boasting seven doubles and three mixed doubles in addition to her singles tally.
1973: Despite Billie-Jean King's crushing 6-4 6-4 6-3 defeat of Bobby Riggs in the "battle of the sexes" in Houston, former Wimbledon champion Arthur Ashe later claims the best place for women "is at home having babies".