phase-shift keying

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phase-shift keying

[′fāz ¦shift ‚kē·iŋ]
(communications)
A form of phase modulation in which the modulating function shifts the instantaneous phase of the modulated wave between predetermined discrete values. Abbreviated PSK.

phase modulation

Varying the angle of a wave in a carrier in order to transmit analog or digital data. For digital signals, phase modulation (PM) is widely used in conjunction with amplitude modulation (AM). For example, quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) uses both phase and amplitude modulation to create different binary states for transmission (see QAM). See modulation and carrier.


Vary the Angle
In PM modulation, the angle of the carrier wave is varied by the incoming signal. In this example, the modulating wave implies an analog signal.







Digital Phase Shift Keying (PSK)
For digital signals, phase shift keying (PSK) uses two phases for 0 and 1 as in this example. See DPSK.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultra-long distance connections of 9,000km are now possible through Nortel's recent development of a 40G Ultra Long Haul solution which employs coherent Dual Polarization Binary Phase Shift Keying (DP BPSK) technology that can more than double the distance that 40G traffic can travel.
Because the preamble and header always are sent at a 1-Mb/s rate using binary phase shift keying (BPSK), the dark blue and red triangles occupy only two areas opposite each other.
The former uses differential binary phase shift keying (DBPSK) and the latter uses differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK).