Akedah

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Akedah

biblical account of God commanding Abraham’s offerings. [Jewish Hist.: Wigoder, 17]
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Jews worldwide will be reading during the Jewish New Year -- Thursday and Friday of this week -- about the Binding of Isaac ("the Akeda") the near-sacrifice of Isaac that is halted at the last minute by an angel, a startling scene Rembrandt recreates in one of the works featured.
In The Sacrifice there is a recreation of the binding of Isaac as a cowboy and Indian exercise derived from the movie fare imbibed by everyone except the hero's relentless Talmudic father.
That too is part of our spiritual DNA, and our tradition ensures that we do not forget it, by making the Akedah, the story of Abraham's binding of Isaac, the subject of the Torah portion allotted to the second day of Rosh Ha-Shanah.
Soren Kierkegaard, in Fear and Trembling, made the episode known as the binding of Isaac, or the Aquedah, the centerpiece of his multi-dimensional exploration of faith and its relationship to reason and ethics.
I have no other option than to return to my secular interpretation: Abraham stages the binding of Isaac in order to tie him to God, who rescues him at the last moment from the hands of his father.
In attempting to explain Isaac's mother Sarah's death immediately following the binding of Isaac (Genesis 22-23), he makes the stunning suggestion that her death was in fact a quasi-suicide, or a protest against God because of Israel's suffering.
and she gives a positive interpretation to some of our most difficult stories (the reading of the Binding of Isaac is one especially sensitive example).
The binding of Isaac underpins the religious covenant.
Since some Jews of the first century were reading the story of the binding of Isaac as their foundation story -- and reading it as the story of the death and resurrection of the beloved son -- it is perhaps not so utterly nonsensical to think that Peter and his friends may have found it a key to understanding the frightening and confusing events of the execution as "King of the Jews" of their beloved rebbe and of whatever it was that happened "on the first day of the [following] week.
THE FOLLOWING COMMENTARY ON THE BIBLICAL story known as "the binding of Isaac," which is published here for the first time, was recently discovered in the geniza of the old synagogue in Troyes, France, a mid-sized city southeast of Paris, on the Seine River.
Abraham's binding of Isaac is both unthinking and timid.
The results of this decision are conspicuous, as when he reads the Binding of Isaac in Gen.