Akedah

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Akedah

biblical account of God commanding Abraham’s offerings. [Jewish Hist.: Wigoder, 17]
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The Binding of Isaac (Genesis 22:1-13) is well known for its brevity and narrative silence, leading Erich Auerbach to claim that "the journey is like a silent progress through the indeterminate and the contingent, a holding of the breath, a process which has no present, which is inserted, like a blank duration, between what has passed and what lies ahead.
As Jewish lore recognizes Abraham as a relatively hospitable man, the binding of Isaac as a trial of faith and one that the god, undoubtedly, opposed and therefore "was not done.
In James's epistle, the binding of Isaac is the defining moment of biblical faith, as his reading compresses the span of eight chapters, and then transposes the order between Genesis 15.
Whereas, in the dialogue with God about Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham shares with God the sovereignty of Right; in the tale of the binding of Isaac, he gets a chunk of divine Might.
In addition to the numerous biblical allusions in the novel, the subversion of the myth of the Binding of Isaac coincides with one of the book's major subplots: the question of who will succeed the Rebbe in Asher's parents' Ladover community.
In drawing creatively upon midrashic material about the Akedah (the binding of Isaac as he is about to be sacrificed), Diski's "supplement" Wright suggests, is perhaps best viewed in the Derridean sense of the term, in that it both adds onto and replaces the original text.
Abraham's Curse: The Roots of Violence in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam examines the story in Genesis 22 that rabbinic texts called the Aqedah, or binding of Isaac, and how it has been used in the three Abrahamic faiths to justify violence and martyrdom.
Thus we explore, for example, the relations between Adrienne Rich's "An Atlas of the Difficult World" and the Book of Lamentations and between Allen Ginsberg's "Kaddish" and Rashi's gloss of the biblical episode of the binding of Isaac.
Midstream's reigning contemporary commentator on Scripture, Lippman Bodoff, has published quite a few articles in these pages on the Akedah and has even collected all his work on that very subject in a brillian book published in 2005 (The Binding of Isaac, Religious Murder, and Kabbalah, Devora Publishing).
In Genesis 22, the Binding of Isaac, is Sarah present, but unmentioned?
The ram's horn reminds us of the binding of Isaac (Genesis 22) when, instead of sacrificing his son, Abraham offered a ram up to God.
162-171), Professor Pangle tests this hypothesis with the "greatest trial," the ultimate case for justice's requiring real (not "merely apparent" sacrifice): the binding of Isaac.