Binyon


Also found in: Dictionary.

Binyon

(Robert) Laurence. 1869--1943, British poet and art historian, best known for his elegiac war poems "For the Fallen" (1914) and "The Burning of the Leaves" (1944)
References in periodicals archive ?
In his essay for Rhythm, Binyon promotes the seriousness with which one must consider poetry: 'It would be possible, perhaps, to find some word more convincing than poetry, but I have not found one' (1).
The primary attraction was the museum's collection of Japanese wood-block color prints (nishiki-e), which Binyon had expanded and promoted with "the perseverance and bloody-mindedness of a compulsive stamp collector" (110).
Miss Miles, who later married and became Amelia Brown, served at a military hospital in Arc-en-Barrois alongside Laurence Binyon, who wrote the enduring war poem For The Fallen.
For The Fallen, Laurence Binyon THEY called it the war to end all wars.
Binyon's magisterial biography of Russia's most famous, most explored, but perhaps most elusive and least understood poet.
Cheryl Binyon from the Humber Group commented: "This kind of practical support did not exist before and it definitely fills a gap and responds to a growing, urgent need.
(3.) Hobson RL, Binyon L, Siren O, March B, Strange EF, Harada J, et al.
The four lines of the Ode comprise the fourth stanza of Laurence Binyon's poem For the Fallen and the issue is that the word "condemn" should be "contemn".
Binyon untangles the myth of poet Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin and examines the real complexity of his character and work.
Partnership, The (UK), Martin Binyon; phone: 44-207-731-3233; martin@thepartnership.uk.com, p.
Binyon's magnificent biography makes plain, the apparently manic-depressive, womanizing, jealous, attention-deficient Pushkin chose, or had forced upon him, the perfection of his work over the perfection of his life.
Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-89) the painter who helped to popularise Japanese art in Britain; Robert Lawrence Binyon (1869-1943), poet, art-historian and critic, who was a keeper of prints and drawings at the British Museum and who fostered an appreciation of oriental art; Ryuzo Mikimoto (1894-1971) who was a famous pearl manufacturer and promoter of the work of Ruskin in Japan; and Bernard Howell Leach (1887-1979), a potter who went to Japan in 1908, exhibited etchings and experimented with a kiln belonging to Kozan Horokawa.