Bío-Bío

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Bío-Bío

(bē`ō-bē`ō), river, c.240 mi (390 km) long, rising in the Andes of central Chile and flowing NW to the Pacific Ocean near Concepción. It forms a natural divide between middle and southern Chile. It is navigable for much of its length by flat-bottomed boats, but is rapid and has hydroelectric potential. In colonial times bitter fighting took place along its banks between Spanish forces under Pedro de ValdiviaValdivia, Pedro de
, c.1500–1554, Spanish conquistador, conqueror of Chile. One of Francisco Pizarro's best officers in the conquest of Peru, educated, energetic, somewhat less cruel and avaricious than his fellow conquerors, Valdivia obtained permission from Pizarro to
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 and Araucanian natives. In 1612 the Bío-Bío was fixed as the boundary to native territory; today the Mapuche people live to the south.
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Ejemplo de tabla para el mes de agosto Agosto No de noticias Minutos al aire Entrevista de (INDICADOR de la noticia analisis DE VOLUMEN) *Porcentaje (INDICADOR DE (INDICADOR DE INTERPRETATI VOLUMEN) -VIDAD Canal 9 Bio-Bio TV TVU TVN Red Bio-Bio Agosto Connotacion Tematica Bloque del (INDICADOR DE (INDICADOR noticiero INTERPRETATI DE (INDICADOR -VIDAD) EQUILIBRIO) DE EQUILIBRIO) Canal 9 Bio-Bio TV TVU TVN Red Bio-Bio Fuente: Elaboracion propia.
Cono Sparkling from Bio-Bio Now for something completely different.
Military officials discarded the risk of a tsunami following the two strong aftershocks, but people living in coastline regions, such as Bio-Bio, complain that they are not receiving enough information, the paper says.
Juan Pablo Gramsch, ex Director del Serviu de la Region del Bio-Bio, expuso el Proyecto de Recuperacion Urbana de la Ribera Norte del Bio-Bio.
By 1979 that was down to 350,000 hectares, and it continues to decrease drastically as a result of clear-cut logging and massive development projects such as a dam on the Bio-Bio River.
Construction of the Ralco hydroelectric dam on the Bio-Bio River in Chile--being built by Spain's Endesa Chile and backed by the government--has pushed hundreds of indigenous Pehuenche families off their native land in the river's valley.
Meanwhile, the Ralco Dam, headed by Endesa of Chile, would block a portion of the Bio-Bio River to produce much-needed hydroelectric power.