Biocatalysis


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Related to Biocatalysis: biocatalyst, biotransformation

Biocatalysis

 

the acceleration by enzymes of chemical reactions in living organisms. Biocatalysis is a process that is highly efficient and specific, and—unlike chemical catalysis—it takes place under “mild” conditions—that is, those that are natural to the living organism (temperature, pressure, reaction of the environment, and so on).

References in periodicals archive ?
The rapid implementation, economic benefits and 'green' reputation of biocatalysis provide superior solutions for solving complex chemistry problems.
Biocatalysis is Almac's first choice for any scale-up of chiral chemistry due to the cost, efficiency, robustness and 'green' benefits that result.
Note that in the case of fermentation and biocatalysis, already commercially viable, more incremental technology developments are likely to happen, simply building on existing fundamental knowledge bases to increase market share.
Its biocatalysis division originated in ICI Billingham as part of its pharmaceutical activities but, as the company fragmented, the division has evolved through Zeneca and Avecia before being bought from Avecia by Piramal Healthcare in 2005.
The team based at Wilton has experience of biocatalysis stretching back 20 years and in addition to running its own projects will be involved in directing a satellite biocatalysis group based at the company headquarters in Mumbai, India.
Specialty enzymes, which include enzymes for the biocatalysis, diagnostic, pharmaceutical, and research and biotechnology markets, will continue to benefit from advances in biotechnology that facilitate new application development, thereby expanding potential demand.
The centre will provide a ``one stop shop'' for industrial scientists to develop and learn new techniques in biochemistry, genetics, enzymology, and microbial biochemistry as applied to biocatalysis and biotransformations.
This demand is fueled by the commercialization of novel, high-value enzymes designed for specific applications, including biocatalysis, pharmaceuticals, and other fast-growing markets.
These disciplines include traditional fermentation, biocatalysis, enzymology, molecular biology, bioprocess engineering and conventional crop-breeding techniques.
Biocatalysis is a particularly attractive alternative for making these compounds and has the additional advantage of doing so by green, environmentally friendly syntheses.
He is working with ASAE member Sue Nokes, UK associate professor in the biosystems and agricultural engineering department, to investigate the effects of preprocessing -- fermentation, downstream processing, and immobilization conditions -- on the performance of whole cell biocatalysis in nonaqucous solvents using moderate pressure.
including homogenous, heterogeneous and biocatalysis with emphasis on current growth areas such as chiral catalysts, polymerisation catalysts, enzymatic catalysis and clean catalytic methods.