Biocriminology

Biocriminology

 

a school of bourgeois criminology which explains the existence of crime on biological grounds. The origin of such theories in the second half of the 19th century is linked with the name of the Italian physician and psychiatrist C. Lombroso, originator of the theory of the hereditary criminal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Her observation that all aspects of Tarzan's high status, even among the most evolved group, are heritable leads, however, to the observation that the fortunes of Tarzan of the Apes often correlate with moments of renewed cultural interest in "biocriminology" (115).
(46) See Greta Olson, "Criminalized Bodies in Literature and Biocriminology," The Body as Interface: Dialogues Between the Disciplines, ed.
The meeting of these two tendencies fostered the reinsertion of animals into criminological discourse, a movement that occurred in the perspectives of "evolutionary psychology" and "evolutionary ecology" or, more simply, "biocriminology."
Animals occupy two discursive roles in biocriminology. In studies that claim causal relationships between human nature and crime, animal behavior tends implicitly to be posited as an expression of the unproblematic negation of human morality, as the dark underbelly of human life.
Space limitations do not allow me properly to assess the role of animals in biocriminology, though it would be remiss of me to refrain from comment altogether.
Oddly, a section on biocriminology is included in this chapter.