Biogenic Amines


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Biogenic Amines

 

proteinogenic amines, a group of nitrogen-containing organic compounds that form in human, animal, plant, and bacterial organisms through the decarboxylation (splitting off of the COOH group) of amino acids. Many biogenic amines—histamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, adrenaline, tyramine, and others—are biologically active substances that affect processes of inhibition and excitation in the cerebral cortex and the subcortical centers and evoke changes in blood pressure—by means of vasodilation or vasoconstriction—and other bodily changes. Many biogenic amines that are formed in the large intestine in man and animals by the action of putrefactive bacteria are toxic. Biogenic amines are biologically inactivated primarily by means of oxidative deamination (splitting off of the amino group), which is catalyzed by a group of enzymes—the amine oxidases. Adenosine phosphoric acids, nucleic acids, and high-molecular-weight carbohydrates such as heparin play an important role in the binding of biogenic amines by biochemical cell components. Biogenic amines present in cells in a bound state are inactive and are not affected by amine oxidases.

I. S. SEVERINA

References in periodicals archive ?
Biogenic amines during ripening in "Semicotto Caprino" cheese: role of Enterococci.
We speculate that the hemorrhage and lesions of renal epithelial cells might be attributed to the vasoconstriction induced by biogenic amines present in the toad venom.
According to Kucerova, et al [15], biogenic amine at production on network fishes out by bacterias of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Proteus, Streptococus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Photobacterium, Klebsiella, and Hafnia one that result histidin decarboxylase's enzyme.
Therefore, histamine may act in different pathways to regulate physiological events from the other biogenic amines in crustaceans (Sainath & Reddy 2010).
This collection describes the pharmacology, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of biogenic amine in the central nervous system of vertebrates and invertebrates.
[11.] Ferreira IM and O Pinho Biogenic amines in Portuguese traditional foods and wines, Journal of Food Protection 2006; 69 (11): 2293-2303.
Existing models proposed to explain the roles of biogenic amines cannot fully explain all aspects of aggressive behavior and how it can be adjusted to varying circumstances.
Amphibian granular glands produce numerous biologically active compounds including; biogenic amines, peptides, proteins, bufadienolidies, tetrodotoxins, and lipophilic alkaloids (see review Daly et al.
Disorders of tetrahydrobiopterin and related biogenic amines. In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D, eds.