biocoenosis

(redirected from Biological community)
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Related to Biological community: habitat

biocoenosis

, biocenosis
a diverse community inhabiting a single biotope

biocoenosis

[‚bī·ō·sə′nō·səs]
(ecology)
A group of organisms that live closely together and form a natural ecologic unit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, it is not quite the same as measuring the biodiversity of a biological community.
Interrelationships between vent fluid chemistry, temperature, seismic activity and biological community structure at a mussel-dominated deep-sea hydrothermal vent along the East Pacific Rise.
Turbidity has been identified as a potential contributing cause of biological community impairment in Tinkers Creek.
While the risks of excessive nutrients are many, too few nutrients may result in insufficient enrichment of the aquatic food chain, which would be detrimental to a healthy aquatic biological community.
Also, I want this to be available to the biological community; accessible to everybody.
* ecosystem: a biological community, including plants, animals, and microorganisms, considered together with its environment.
Below our feet and out of sight lies a dynamic, diverse and abundant biological community. Yvonne Baskin follows pioneer scientists uncovering the world of soil ecology in Under Ground: How Creatures of Mud and Dirt Shape Our World (Island Press, $26.95).
Its goal is to make the results of large-scale computer simulations more accessible to the biological community. To that end, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Wash., has become the first institution outside the UK to join the BioSimGrid.
While it's not unusual to find a few small eels in colder water deep beneath the surface, it is unprecedented to find hundreds or perhaps thousands of eels dominating the biological community around a hydrothermal vent.
We provide two examples of ecologic indicators that can improve our understanding of these inherent problems: a) the use of photopigments as indicators of the interactive effects of nutrients and hydrology, and b) biological community approaches that use multiple taxa to detect effects on ecosystem structure and function.
Organic matter management leads to more stable soil aggregates, increased infiltration rates, and a healthy soil biological community. These improvements in soil structure and water cycling are fundamental to addressing problems of erosion, while at the same time beneficially impacting airborne particulate matter, drought susceptibility, flooding, water quality, nutrient cycling, and plant vigor.

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