biological oceanography


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Related to biological oceanography: Geological oceanography, Physical oceanography

biological oceanography

[¦bī·ə¦läj·ə·kəl ‚ō·shə′näg·rə·fē]
(oceanography)
The study of the flora and fauna of oceans in relation to the marine environment.
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On receiving the award Professor Duarte said, "I am deeply honored to have my research contributions and scientific discoveries in the fields of marine ecology and biological oceanography recognized by an award that celebrates my mentor Prof.
This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Biological Oceanography Program, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Bimini Biological Field Station.
of Montreal, Canada) and Louis Legendre (biological oceanography, Pierre & Marie Curie U., France) present this text of data analysis methods for ecologists, with an emphasis on use of the statistical computer language R.
"The removal of predators like sharks and sea otters, bass and wolves has consequences," said David Garrison, director of NSF's Biological Oceanography Program, "not only for these species, but for all of us."
Matweyou earned a master's degree in biological oceanography from the UAF School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences.
Fractals, those intriguing geometric shapes that are composed of increasingly smaller copies of themselves can be found in mathematics, art, music, and, as Seuront (biological oceanography, Flinders U., Australia) notes, in atmospheric and oceanic turbulence.
Yet in my opinion what was important and not voiced nor appreciated was that his unique insights and creativity helped to propel plankton research from a field dominated by classical taxonomy into a major feature of biological oceanography. This covers the time period of the introduction of carbon-14 analysis to satellite oceanography.
Skinner (who earned her Ph.D in biological oceanography as a student of Dr.
This work will include physical oceanography, biological oceanography, veterinary medicine and help from the college of engineering to discover how these animals make a living."
"As the world warms, we expect more intense tropical hurricanes," says James McCarthy, a professor of biological oceanography at Harvard Univ., Cambridge.
"The largest we sunk was about 30 tons, and that was a gray whale, and very challenging," recalls Smith, a professor of biological oceanography at the University of Hawaii.
Specifically, bio-optical and bioacoustic methods would revolutionize biological oceanography and fisheries biology.

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