biological magnification

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Related to Biomagnification: bioaccumulation

biological magnification

[‚bī·ə¦läj·ə·kəl ‚mag·nə·fə′kā·shən]
(ecology)
The increasing concentration of toxins from pesticides, herbicides, and various types of waste in living organisms that accompanies cycling of nutrients through the trophic levels of food webs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mercury biomagnification and the trophic structure of the ichthyofauna from a remote lake in the Brazilian Amazon.
It may cause the incremental increase in concentration of Hg and/or Se at each level of a food chain, namely biomagnifications and thus, the higher burden in organism.
The biomagnification process of contaminants is the increase of contaminants concentration through the food web, achieving the highest concentration in top chain organisms.
Foxes can provide information on Hg biomagnification patterns and changes in exposure.
Biomagnification of mercury in aquatic food webs: a worldwide meta-analysis.
Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification of Total Mercury in Four Exploited Shark Species in the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico.
(17.) Frank AP, Gobas C, Wilcockson JB, Russell RW, Haffner GD (1998) Mechanism of Biomagnification in Fish under Laboratory and Field Conditions Environ sci technol 33: 133-141.
By the time you get to the large fish, you have 'biomagnification,' the levels increasing as you go up the chain, especially out in the ocean.
This is the first report of biomagnification of a trace element across 3 trophic levels involving P.
Carson's writing drew public attention to the phenomenon of chemical biomagnification, explaining how pesticide concentration actually increased up the food chain, so that creatures such as raptors were being found dead with far higher concentrations of DDT in their bodies than had originally been sprayed over the fields.
Carnivorous fish, especially tuna, are considered to have higher mercury levels because of a process called biomagnification. This is where the garbage on the ocean floor causes levels of mercury to be enhanced as it is circulated up the food chain after originally being eaten by bottom-dwellers like crabs.