biopolitics

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biopolitics

(FOUCAULT’ s term) the form of political reason/intervention in which the power to take life is replaced by the power to foster life or disallow it – leading to a disciplining of the human BODY and 'S oul’, and a regulation of the population. See also PANOPTICAN, CONFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGIES.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the most provocative philosophy of Jack Kirby, Derrida's consideration of the relationship between the beast and the sovereign is, perhaps unexpectedly, infused with a noteworthy dose of biopolitical optimism, despite Derrida's longstanding reputation as a political cynic and so-called moral relativist.
(27) Thus what distinguishes liberal governmentality from other ways of governing is the biopolitical nature of liberal governmentality.
In the biopolitical regulation of populations war is literally at the front line.
Part 1, "Biopolitical Choreographies: Performing the Body as Racial and Political Space," includes: Bozena Karwowska, "Metaphors of Dancing and the Human Body in Nazi Concentration Camps" (31-42); Patricia Vertinsky, "From Dance under the Swastika to Movement Education: A Study of Embodied Culture" (43-56); Gabriele Brandstetter, "Political Body Spaces in the Performances of William Forsythe" (57-74); Jeremy Redlich, "Reading Skin Signs: Decoding Skin as the Fluid Boundary between Self and Other in Yoko Tawada" (75-90).
This idea of infection of wounds is precisely the complete opposite of any form of immunitarian paradigm that characterized much of modern biopolitical practice at a global level.
"The newsfeed is perhaps, then, one of the most important biopolitical features on Facebook; a 'performative' virtual playground that drives the production of subjectivities on-line, while simultaneously acting as site of capture for the immaterial labour required for users to remain recognizable." (2)
This article argues that the biological determinist view of sexual orientation is best understood as a biopolitical position, drawing on Foucault's (1990) concept of biopower--the management of social groups through wielding power over bodies, both materially and discursively.
Bromden sees that the power of the mental health care system is ubiquitously entrapping--just another manifestation of the power system of the broader society, or what the deconstructionists would call the biopolitical state.
in the movements and tropes of this discursive battle, from the criminological essays in Prestol's Distribucion geografica del crimen (1940) to the pages of El Masacre se pasa a pie, I hope to show not only the contradictory advances of a liberal thinker who failed to completely transcend the prejudices of his class and moment, but also the unbroken narrative of what Foucault termed the biopolitical state, which has re-coded racism in ways that continue to exert social control through the body and to march through adaptive means to a racially encoded eugenics.
Beyond Foucault's biopolitical thesis according to which modernity is increasingly characterized by the way in which power directly captures life as such as its object, what interests Agamben the most is:
In this article, I argue that this project can be conceived of as a biopolitical campaign where nongovernmental and community-based organizations are viewed as a kind of panacea for the problem of slums.
Among their topics are about the biopolitical character of the nature of life and death: considerations about Michel Foucault's political ontology, the threshold of nature: an approach through poetry, resilience as an interpretive key to the relationship between man and nature in the Middle Ages, taming nature: early modern variations on the human-animal relationship, and contested natures: cultural valuations of nature and environmental practices in the Puna de Atacama in northwestern Argentina.