biosolid


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to biosolid: Sewage sludge

biosolid

[¦bī·ō‚säl·əd]
(civil engineering)
A recyclable, primarily organic solid material produced by wastewater treatment processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Communities are often concerned about whether the use of biosolid fertilizers could lead to migration of bacteria and viruses away from the site of application, for instance in aerosols carried by air currents or by movement of pathogens through soil and into groundwater.
In 2018, Illinois American Water partnered with Illinois farmers to apply over 31,000 tons of residuals and biosolids, rather than sending them to a landfill.
In search of a cheaper and more permanent fix, they entered into discussions with Terrapure Organics Solutions (formerly Terrapure Environment) to establish a trial project to apply municipally treated biosolids.
Mixing the biosolid material with clay for use in brick manufacture would cut down on the 30 per cent of sewage still sent to landfill or stored.
The Lewiston-Auburn, Maine Water Pollution Control Authority needed new options to dispose of biosolids due to the rising costs of applying it to farm fields.
In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the different chemical forms of copper and zinc in biosolid, of the city of Montes Claros/MG, cultivated with Pennisetum purpureum in different periods.
To demonstrate the effects of DWB and CB on the change in the residual bioavailable fractions of Cu and Zn after one harvest, the ratios of DTPA-extractable to total concentrations of metals (as determined by XRF) in biosolid-amended soil samples were plotted against the biosolid application rate (Figs 2, 3); the expected ratios were also plotted for comparison.
Assessment of indicators of fecal contamination in soils treated with biosolids for growing grasses
The amendments had taken place 16 to 24 years earlier during a series of studies on biosolid amendments, and they had been applied to the soils at several different rates.
The nanoparticles had a marked impact on plants' growing ability--reducing the growth of one plant species by 22% as compared with silver-free biosolid treatment.
Interviewees suggested that organizational, political, logistical, and scientific challenges should be considered when designing a protocol to investigate human illness reports attributed to biosolids land application.