Bioswale


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Bioswale

A landscape element, often a planted strip along a street or parking lot, for the purpose of capturing surface water runoff and filtering out silt and pollution before the stormwater enters the drainage system or groundwater and retains and cleanses runoff from a site, roadway, or other source.
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With money and coordination from the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District, Altius team members made use of a Bioswale filtration system to mitigate harm from storm water.
Additionally, the building will include solar panels on the roof and over the parking area and bioswale gardens at its base to treat and retain storm water.
One such cost-effective and resilient approach is the bioswale. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines bioswales as "vegetated, mulched or xeriscaped channels that provide treatment and retention as they move stormwater from one place to another."
An extra $500,000 is needed to provide reinforced concrete around the bioswale planters required by the city to treat stormwater runoff, McGlone said.
Another grant was awarded for the creation of a school "bioswale," a landscape drainage feature that removes pollutants from surface runoff water.
* Installing bioswale natural water drainage to retain storm water runoff and decrease flooding
Under an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, Rochester, N.Y., builder Atlantic Funding & Real Estate will pay a $50,000 penalty for stormwater control rule violations at its Gateway Landing development, and invest nearly $70,000 in a bioswale to filter silt and pollution from the site's contaminated runoff into the Erie Canal.
These elements could include a green roof on an office building, a rain garden in a front yard, a bioswale in a parking lot, or a road with permeable pavement.
INNOVATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN: In the spring of 2012 ChemTrack designed and built an Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation-approved bioswale system at the Delta Western gas station in Haines.
At the edge of the open space corridor is a bioswale, which acts to limit urban runoff, nutrients and pollutants from disturbing and damaging the contiguous open space and gardens.
This water flows through a bioswale and then a rough 50-micron filter before being used for landscaping, irrigation and flushing toilets.
Safeway employs bioswale filtration to filter storm water.