Biothermic Pit

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Biothermic Pit

 

(also Beccari pit, Piriatin pit, Czech pit), a structure for disposing of animal carcasses. It is built according to a standard design from moisture- and heatproof material, and it has a hermetic roof and openings for the influx of air. In 20 days after the chamber is loaded with carcasses, the temperature rises to 65° C. The process of carcass disintegration is concluded in 35 to 40 days, with the formation of a homogeneous and odorless compost which may be used as fertilizer. A biothermic pit has a significant advantage over cattle graveyards in that it ensures the quick destruction of many microbes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A biothermic pit, a structure for disposing of animal carcasses, was built in the Orto-Saz village of Naryn region, said the head of the village council Azamat Narynbekov.
"One of the first biothermic pits was built in the Orto-Saz village.