Xylitol

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Related to Birch sugar: xylitol

xylitol

[′zī·lə‚tȯl]
(organic chemistry)
CH2OH(CHOH)3CH2OH Pentahydric alcohols derived from xylose. Also known as xylite.

Xylitol

 

CH2OH(CHOH)3CH2OH a polyhydric alcohol (pentitol), an optically inactive isomer; colorless hygroscopic crystals with a sweet taste. Xylitol is soluble in water, alcohol, glycols, acetic acid, and pyridine. It has the same calorific value as sugar (4 kcal/g) but is twice as sweet; however, it has no biological value. It has no adverse effect on organisms and is therefore used in the food industry, for example, as a sugar substitute in the manufacture of sweet edibles for individuals suffering from diabetes and obesity.

Xylitol exhibits a cholagogic and aperient effect; the prescribed daily dosage should not exceed 50 g. It can also be used in the preparation of esters, surface-active agents, and synthetic resins. In industry xylitol is prepared by the reduction of xylose; vegetable byproducts such as corn cobs and cotton husks serve as raw material for this process.

References in periodicals archive ?
Five-a-day doses of birch sugar given as a syrup proved less effective in preventing ear infections, trot a distinction still emerged between birch sugar syrup and sucrose syrup.
Even though it is a sweetener, birch sugar was shown to prevent tooth decay in earlier tests.
Laboratory experiments have shown that birch sugar inhibits growth of Streptococcus mutans, a bacterium that causes dental caries.