Birnam wood

Birnam wood

apparently comes to Dunsinane, fulfilling a prophecy misinterpreted by Macbeth. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare Macbeth]
See: Trees
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"Birnam Wood has come to Dunsinane, Rosy," said Dr.
Grief, gnawing at his heart, had not sagged his ample waistcoat, which preceded him as he moved in much the same manner as Birnam Woods preceded the army of Macduff.
A hint of the prophetic runs through all the favourite Scottish stereotypes, from Shakespeare's Weird Sisters foreseeing the coming of Birnam Wood to Dunsinane, to Billy Connolly's gallus wisdom, through the fatalism of the Reverend IM Jolly, to the unshakeable conviction of any Scottish football fan propping up the bar.
One of the aspects of the play is that the Birnam Wood trees are stylised and they're poles so we have trained the witches to climb them so that there is a sense of them having a place to escape to especially when the fighting starts.
Other plot points (the circumstances of Macduff's birth; the moving of Birnam Wood) are less clear, but there is no mistaking the tumultuous events of the tragedy as they unfold.
The brasserie is named after the Birnam Oak, which is the last fragment of the Birnam Wood, 30 miles from the hotel and made famous by Shakespeare's Macbeth.
The last remaining oak from Macbeth's Birnam Wood, in Dunkeld, Perthshire, is also among those on shortlists for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland unveiled by the Woodland Trust in a contest backed by the People's Postcode Lottery.
Brenda Roddy said: "They reckon it's the one tree left from the Birnam Wood dating back to PEOPLE come from all around to see the famous Birnam Oak, just a five-minute drive from Dunkeld.
In fact, the production, which relies on a simple design concept using large muslin panels on wheels that can help to cast shadows representing stage battles or the trees of Birnam Wood, asks the audience to use their own imaginations "to make it look like something real," points out Epstein.
I love the sense of space in and around the hall and the ability to walk out of the gate and be straight into Birnam Wood. It's been our home for 35 years and we love every inch of it."
The night of the event, our dining room, populated by a forest of hungry, sweaty, seven-foot giants, looked as though Birnam Wood had come to Dunsinane.
The long lines of Scottish pikes, arranged in the new, fashionable continental manner must have truly seemed like Birnam Wood.