Birobidzhan


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Birobidzhan:

see Jewish Autonomous RegionJewish Autonomous Region
or Birobidzhan
, autonomous region (1995 pop. 211,900), c.13,800 sq mi (35,700 sq km), Khabarovsk Territory, Russian Far East, in the basins of the Biro and Bidzhan rivers, tributaries of the Amur. The capital is Birobidzhan.
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, Russia.

Birobidzhan

 

(named for the Bira and Bidzhan rivers), a city, center of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR. Located on the Bira River (tributary of the Amur). Railroad station on the Trans-Siberian Railway, 175 km west of Khabarovsk. Population, 56,000 (1970; in 1939, 30,000). There is light industry (production of knit and sewn articles, footwear, and others). The Dal’sel’mash Agricultural Machinery Plant and a power transformer plant are located in Birobidzhan, as are enterprises of the woodworking and food industries. There are evening mechanical and mechanical engineering technicums and medical, pedagogical, and cultural enlightenment colleges. There is a museum of regional studies and two national theaters (Jewish and Russian). Birobidzhan arose in 1928 on the location of the small Tikhon’kaia station. It has been a city since 1937.

Birobidzhan

, Birobijan
1. a city in SE Russia: capital of the Jewish Autonomous Region. Pop.: 82 000 (1994)
2. another name for the Jewish Autonomous Region
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the sharp directives issued by People's Commissar of Transport Kaganovich, the decree of 16 June 1937 appears odd, because it suggests concrete measures to finance housing at the stations Obluch'e, Khabarovsk 1, and Khabarovsk 2, and public works at the railroad settlements at the stations Pervaia Rechka, Arkhara, Obluch'e, Bira, Birobidzhan, In, and Viazemskaia.
After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Stark began traveling across Eastern Europe for B'nai B'rith and other Jewish organizations to run outreach programs in cities like Vilna, Riga, and Birobidzhan.
Henry Felix Srebrnik, Dreams of Nationhood: American Jewish Communists and the Soviet Birobidzhan Project, 1924-1951, Academic Studies Press, Boston, 2010.
Srebrnik, Henry Felix, Jerusalem on the Amur: Birobidzhan and the Canadian Jewish Communist Movement, 1924-1951, McGill-Queen's Studies in Ethnic History.
Dreams of nationhood; American Jewish communists and the Soviet Birobidzhan project, 1924-1951.
Henry Felix Srebrnik Jerusalem on the Amur: Birobidzhan and the Canadian Jewish Communist Movement, 1924-1951.
Jerusalem on the Amur : Birobidzhan and the Canadian Jewish Communist Movement, 1924-1951.
Seth Wolitz carefully examines the complex genesis of Yoysef Shor (1922) and by meticulous exegesis demonstrates how Berglson marshals narrative techniques, tropes, and imagery to convey the social dynamics of a society in crisis, while Boris Kotlerman investigates the role of Birobidzhan in Berglson's decision-making process.
Apart from a full-length biography, a memoir by Bergelson's son Lev, the first complete bibliography of Bergelson's work in both Yiddish and English, and translations of two of his most influential programmatic essays, this volume offers twelve in-depth essays by a dozen specialists that cover all aspects of Bergelson's extensive corpus, including his little known children's stories, his responses to life in the United States, his support for the Soviet Jewish "homeland" of Birobidzhan, and his anti-Nazi wartime journalism.
we could petition Vladimir Putin to revive the Stalinist project of a Jewish Autonomous Republic in Birobidzhan in the far east of Siberia.
Equally intriguing is a detailed chapter about an early ideological experience with transnationalism, that is, the story of Canadian Jewish Communists in the 1920s and 1930s and their failed hopes for Birobidzhan, a "Jewish Autonomous Region," in the former Soviet Union.
In 2005 officials dedicated new synagogues in Birobidzhan (Jewish Autonomous Oblast), Khabarvosk, Vladivostok, and Yekaterinburg; and opened a Jewish school in Kazan.