birthmark

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birthmark,

pigmented maldevelopment of the skin that varies in size, either present at birth or developing later. Birthmarks may appear as moles (melanocytic nevi) that vary in color from light brown to blue, and are either flat or raised above the surface of the skin. They are usually benign, but do rarely develop into malignant melanoma, a form of skin cancerskin cancer,
malignant tumor of the skin. The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Rarer forms include mycosis fungoides (a type of lymphoma) and Kaposi's sarcoma.
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. The so-called port-wine stains and strawberry marks involve vascular tissue. The flat port-wine stains can be made lighter with the use of laser therapy. The strawberry marks generally disappear a few years after birth.

birthmark

[′bərth‚märk]
(medicine)
Any abnormal cellular or vascular benign nevus that is present at birth or that appears sometime later.
References in periodicals archive ?
Darren said: 'They don't like to give babies general anaesthetic but the birthmark was so aggressive they had to stop it from growing.
James Cook was the first hospital in Western Europe to offer the treatment, which is also used for cancer patients, for birthmarks.
"I was shocked to find out I was the only one doing this," he says, although he feels many with birthmarks try to "hide away" from them.
Alejandro Berenstein, MD, is Director, Hyman-Newman Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Director, Center for Endovascular Surgery, Mount Sinai Health Care System, and Co-Director of the Vascular Birthmarks Institute of New York, New York, NY, USA.
Analysis of the characteristics of neonates with and without birthmarks are summarized in Table 4.
A birthmark is a patch of discolouration in the skin, caused by a collection of small blood vessels or pigment just under the surface.
Others fear that eating strawberries or seeing mice during pregnancy could give their babies birthmarks.
Within a few days, when the lump began to grow and started to bleed, Yvonne panicked and took her baby back to hospital, but medics stuck with the diagnosis and gave her medication to shrink birthmarks.