birthmark

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birthmark,

pigmented maldevelopment of the skin that varies in size, either present at birth or developing later. Birthmarks may appear as moles (melanocytic nevi) that vary in color from light brown to blue, and are either flat or raised above the surface of the skin. They are usually benign, but do rarely develop into malignant melanoma, a form of skin cancerskin cancer,
malignant tumor of the skin. The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Rarer forms include mycosis fungoides (a type of lymphoma) and Kaposi's sarcoma.
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. The so-called port-wine stains and strawberry marks involve vascular tissue. The flat port-wine stains can be made lighter with the use of laser therapy. The strawberry marks generally disappear a few years after birth.

birthmark

[′bərth‚märk]
(medicine)
Any abnormal cellular or vascular benign nevus that is present at birth or that appears sometime later.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are also extremely proud of Oliver, not just for his incredible fundraising efforts but also as a young ambassador for the charity, helping us to achieve one of our aims, which is to raise awareness and acceptance of birthmarks.
Alejandro Berenstein, MD, is Director, Hyman-Newman Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Director, Center for Endovascular Surgery, Mount Sinai Health Care System, and Co-Director of the Vascular Birthmarks Institute of New York, New York, NY, USA.
Analysis of the characteristics of neonates with and without birthmarks are summarized in Table 4.
A birthmark is a patch of discolouration in the skin, caused by a collection of small blood vessels or pigment just under the surface.
Mother-of-four Yvonne, 32, this week told of her fury that doctors believed the growth was just a birthmark because the appearance of the tumour closely resembled one and because her sarcoma tumour is so rare it was difficult to diagnose.
Conclusion: Mongolian blue spot are the commonest pigmented birthmarks observed followed by cafe-au-lait macules and congenital melanocytic nevi.
Despite repeated treatment, the birthmark continued to grow.
First, parents and physicians need to know how to recognize vascular birthmarks, which can be flat or raised.
The report, published in April's American Journal of Ophthalmology, stated researchers performed early vision tests in four infants with vascular birthmarks, or hemangiomas, on the upper or lower eyelids.
Birthmarks may shrink, fade, or grow with the child.