Bishop of Digne

Bishop of Digne

character who forgives Jean Valjean when latter steals the bishop’s valuables. [Fr. Lit.: Les Misérables]

Bishop of Digne

gave starving Valjean food, bed, and comfort. [Fr. Lit.: Les Misérables]
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Ryan O'Gorman will be relieved of his duties portraying the Bishop of Digne and Babet in Les Miserables at the Queen's Theatre in London to return to Teesside next week.
Now in his fourth year with Les Miserables, Adam plays the roles of Grantaire and the Bishop of Digne to packed audiences at the Queen's eatre eight times a week.
He played Courfeyrac - also performing at the Euro 96 finale - and more recently returned as Inspector Javert in the West End and in the 25th anniversary production, before finally playing the Bishop of Digne at the 02 Arena.
Recreating the original West End and Broadway musical hit songs, the cast includes past principal performers from Les Misrables, such as Sarah Ryan, who is also a soprano soloist with the English National Orchestra and has appeared in Songs of Praise; David Fawcett who has played both Brujon, the Bishop of Digne and the leading role of Jean Valjean; and Katie Leeming.
Hugo only refers to Pascal by name in the opening chapters of Les Miserables, in the course of his description of Monseigneur Myriel, the Bishop of Digne.
Albouy and Brombert have commented upon the most significant additions: the Bishop of Digne appears in the novel before Jean Valjean and engages in discussions with both believers and non-believers in which the defenders of God carry off victory; the curious digression after the introduction of the Petit Picpus convent entitled "Parenthese" pleads for the necessity of religious faith; the long exposition of the Battle of Waterloo insists upon the deity's supervision of history.
15) For the Bishop of Digne, whose secure faith spares him the need for metaphysical speculation, this hidden God gives cause for wonder: "sans chercher a comprendre l'incomprehensible, il le regardait.
Is it really possible, this tale asks, to accept, trust in, or offer to others the divine forgiveness that the Bishop of Digne (whom Valjean previously beat and robbed) extended so freely to the embittered ex-convict?
1492, was Bishop of Digne from 1551 until his death in 1568.
He stops at the home of the Bishop of Digne, who treats him well despite Jean's attempts to rob him of some silverware.
Charles Francois Bienvenu Myriel, Bishop of Digne, a good-hearted, devout churchman who gives hospitality to Jean Valjean after the ex-convict's release from the galleys.