bishopric

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bishopric

the see, diocese, or office of a bishop
References in periodicals archive ?
The bishopric of Constantia does not allow donations any more, whereas that of Tamassos issued rules stipulating that Church committees collect donations and give charitable organisations chosen by the family a percentage of the money collected," the source said.
We do not abide by the 2013 central plan employed by the two new Bishoprics.
By the end of the decade, Bulgarian bishoprics had expelled most of the Greek clerics, thus the whole of northern Bulgaria, as well as the northern parts of Thrace and Macedonia had effectively seceded from the Patriarchate.
Today there are three Maronite bishoprics in Syria divided between Damascus, Aleppo and Latakia, the daily cited unnamed ecclesiastical sources as saying.
Members of the Church Commission and Bishoprics and Cathedrals Committee (BCC) visited the 800-year-old castle as part of a review of the building.
Between 1780 and 1830 newly founded bishoprics, notably in Quebec and Calcutta, asserted the principles of a traditional imperial discourse relatively untouched by Enlightenment values.
Had any of the three former bishops truly the courage of their convictions they would have resigned their bishoprics prior to their retirement.
After a chapter on historical interpretations the author looks at North America, Bengal, the Colonial Bishoprics Fund, 1840-1, and Australia and New Zealand.
He succeeded in filling most of the Irish bishoprics but his attempts to reendow Irish parishes were sabotaged locally.
David Foote argues in Lordship, Reform, and the Development of Civil Society in Medieval Italy: The Bishopric of Orvieto, 1100-1250 that bishoprics played an integral role in the formation of civic culture in medieval Italy.
Although the bishoprics of York, London and Colchester were represented at the Council of Arles in 314, Christianity was virtually dead in the south of England when St Augustine landed in Kent in 597.
Pope John Paul II, the head of the bishoprics, gave the go-ahead in a papal Post-it[R] that said, "Paxil in terrum: Viagra pro hominem.