bishop

(redirected from Bishops)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

bishop:

see orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bishop

 

in the Orthodox, Catholic, and Anglican churches the highest order of clergyman, head of a territorial unit of ecclesiastic administration (eparchy, diocese). Christian literary documents of the early second century (the Epistles of Ignatius of Antioch) attest to their managing the property of the early Christian communities. By the late second century the bishops had already concentrated spiritual and juridical authority in their hands and had also possessed themselves of the right to dispose of the community’s property; gradually a monarchical episcopate developed. In the fourth century there began to emerge among the bishops a hierarchical division into patriarchs, metropolitans (some of these bearing the title of archbishop), and bishops proper. The title of bishop has been preserved in some Protestant churches in addition to the Anglican, but in them a bishop is not a clergyman but a person exercising what are for the most part purely administrative functions.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bishop

1. (in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Greek Orthodox Churches) a clergyman having spiritual and administrative powers over a diocese or province of the Church
2. (in some Protestant Churches) a spiritual overseer of a local church or a number of churches
3. a chesspiece, capable of moving diagonally over any number of unoccupied squares of the same colour
4. mulled wine, usually port, spiced with oranges, cloves, etc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
"The Church does not know." The Bishop was struggling hard.
And then, the next moment, "Pardon my sneer, Bishop. But can you wonder that we lose patience with you?
The Bishop was silent, and for once Ernest forbore to press the point.
Said the Bishop to himself, while he looked grimly at Robin, "When this wedding is gone by I will have this fellow well whipped for his saucy tongue and bold speech."
And now fair Ellen and Sir Stephen stood before the altar, and the Bishop himself came in his robes and opened his book, whereat fair Ellen looked up and about her in bitter despair, like the fawn that finds the hounds on her haunch.
The Prior of Emmet and those that belonged to him gathered together like a flock of frightened sheep when the scent of the wolf is nigh, while the Bishop of Hereford, laying aside his book, crossed himself devoutly.
"Nay, that shall not be," protested the Bishop; "the banns must be cried three times in the church.
"Come here, Little John," called Robin impatiently; and plucked off the Bishop's frock from his back and put it on the yeoman.
Now the Bishop was short and fat, and Little John was long and lean.
Mr Merdle made a similar reply, and Bishop explained his reason for inquiring.
Bishop then betook himself up-stairs, and the other magnates gradually floated up after him until there was no one left below but Mr Merdle.
'I will come to-morrow as I drive by.' Bar and Bishop had both been bystanders during this short dialogue, and as Mr Merdle was swept away by the crowd, they made their remarks upon it to the Physician.