Bismarck

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Bismarck,

city (1990 pop. 49,256), state capital and seat of Burleigh co., S central N.Dak., on hills overlooking the Missouri River; inc. 1873. The trade center for a large spring-wheat, livestock, and dairying region, Bismarck is also a financial and telecommunications center, and development of the oil reserves in the nearby Williston Basin is important. Lewis and Clark camped nearby in 1804–5. With the beginning of river traffic in the 1830s, a steamboat port called the "Crossing on the Missouri" emerged here. In 1872, Camp Greeley (later Camp Hancock) was erected to protect workers building the Northern Pacific RR. When the railroad reached the fort the next year, a town was laid out, subsequently named Bismarck in the hope of attracting German investment in the railroad. Bismarck boomed as a river port and railroad center, a gateway for western expansion, and supply point for the Black Hills gold rush (1874). It became the territorial capital in 1883.

Bismarck

1
Prince Otto (Eduard Leopold) von , called the Iron Chancellor. 1815--98, German statesman; prime minister of Prussia (1862--90). Under his leadership Prussia defeated Austria and France, and Germany was united. In 1871 he became the first chancellor of the German Reich

Bismarck

2
a city in North Dakota, on the Missouri River: the state capital. Pop.: 56 344 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Zimmermann's calculation that Mexico could distract the United States long enough for victory was not an absurd idea, but instead a well thought out, diplomatic maneuver based on long established Bismarckian traditions to "exploit and moderate" adversaries in order to strengthen Germany's influence.
The new framework as envisioned by the ILO (1950) was conceived to cover a wider range of contingencies (not only destitution as under the late 17th century Poor Laws); provide benefits more nearly adequate to needs (instead of just basic or a limited backbone structure of benefits); break the tie between contribution payments and benefit rights, and therefore consolidating wage relations and going beyond the Bismarckian contributive model that perpetrated unequal access to benefits; and finally, to unify the finance and administration of previously separated branches to allow individuals as citizens to switch categories rather than be bound within one system simply as workers.
Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, building on another Bismarckian observation, noted, "Politics is the art of the possible, the emergence of agreed interests through a process of choice." (22) Theoretical options may not be available in reality.
It drew together the various strands of European politics and culture--the rise of ethnic nationalism, the Bismarckian welfare state, and the collapse of Christianity as a source of social and political orthodoxy and universal aspirations.
Interestingly, however, the Canadian case concerns mobilization over a non-contributory, universal flat pension scheme, which is different than the Bismarckian social insurance model in place in the United States, as well as in continental Europe.
Other scholars have compared this group with the continental European or Bismarckian model.
Solow ([7], 12ff.) discusses several possible reasons for the German downward development in labor market regulations, among which the growth of the service sector (in contrast to the manufacturing sector), gradual weakening of union power, intensified competition through incoming workers, for example, from Eastern Europe, and relics of the Bismarckian organisation of the German welfare state (especially the "male breadwinner household") are underlined as possible negative influences.
(59) One example of this was the famous Radowitz mission: James Stone, "The Radowitz Mission: A Study in Bismarckian Foreign Policy," Militargeschichtliche Mitteilungen, 51 (1992), pp.