bistable


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bistable

1. having two stable states
2. Computing another name for flip-flop

bistable

[¦bī¦stā·bəl]
(science and technology)
Capable of assuming either of two stable states.

bistable

Pronounced "bye-stable." With regard to electronics, it refers to technologies that maintain their binary state without power, although they require power to change it. For example, non-volatile storage, such as flash memory, maintains its 0 or 1 state without power. A flip-flop is a bistable circuit, and E Ink and cholesteric LCDs are bistable display technologies. See non-volatile memory, future memory chips, flip-flop, E Ink and cholesteric LCD.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wu, "Traveling waves in discrete periodic media for bistable dynamics," Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis, vol.
In recent years, bistable piezoelectric energy harvesting has been widely explored.
To illustrate this qualitative description, one can use the standard case of a single-variable dynamical system y(t) moving in a bistable symmetric potential [PHI](y):
The Smart Patch features a 2" electronic paper display powered by a bistable circuit so there's no need to recharge the battery.
Vertebrate and spider peropsins are bistable photopigments that, in the dark, bind all-trans retinal, which is converted to 11-cis retinal by light (Nagata et al., 2010).
In the past 10-15 years a dominant position on the market of medium voltage (MV) circuit breakers, vacuum circuit breakers have taken in which as a drive bistable electromagnetic actuators with high-coercive permanent magnets are used.
The material properties and cross-sectional dimensions of a bistable deployable structure were adapted to optimise the cost of the beam members, while satisfying the deflection and stress constraints.
A curved bistable composite tape-spring was used to deploy the antenna in space using the roll concept.
It is clearly seen in Figure 3(a) that [alpha] = 0.8 produces bistable dynamic where depending on the initial values, solutions may be convergent to the extinction of prey point (0, 0.5) or to interior point.
If a neuron response changes between resting and tonic or bursting spike states, this behavior is considered as bistable spikes.
Obviously, it is consistent with the equilibrium of Stag Hunt games where bistable equilibria appear in case of symmetric 2 by 2 games [16, 17].
To eradicate malaria in bistable regions, we need to make [R.sup.b][tau] > [R.sub.[tau]].