bit density


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bit density

[′bit ′den·səd·ē]
(computer science)
Number of bits which can be placed, per unit length, area, or volume, on a storage medium; for example, bits per inch of magnetic tape. Also known as record density.

bit density

The number of binary digits (bits) that can be stored within a given memory or storage area. See bit and bpi.


One Memory Cell
This is one bit in an early 16MB dynamic RAM (DRAM) chip. Although a thousand times less dense compared to today, there were nevertheless 16,777,216 cells in the quarter-inch-square chip. (Image courtesy of IBM.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The technology provides for reduced optimized element spacing, providing very high bit density for chipless RFID.
A real density (or bit density), the amount of data that can be stored in one square inch of surface area of recording media, has become the most significant factor in the rapid evolution of magnetic storage technologies.
The enhanced magnetic properties of the higher-coercivity MP++ media supported a doubling of the linear bit density to 122 kbpi.
A smoother tape facilitated an increase in bit density allowing more data to be stored in a given square area of tape.
That's because the smaller the diameter of light, the higher the track density and the higher the bit density that can be achieved.