Bitot's spots

(redirected from Bitot's spot)
Also found in: Medical.

Bitot's spots

[′bē·tōs ‚späts]
(medicine)
The silver-gray, shiny, triangular spots on the cornea characteristic of xerosis conjunctivae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Variables Frequency Percentage Sex of the child Male 378 53.5 Female 329 46.5 Age of the child (in months) 6-11 74 10.5 12-23 181 25.6 24-35 174 24.6 36-47 155 21.9 48-59 123 17.4 Birth interval 1st child 289 40.9 1 year 28 4.0 2 years 79 11.2 3 years 84 11.9 4 years and above 227 32.1 Weight changes in the last two weeks Yes 64 9.1 No 643 90.9 Illness in the last two weeks Yes 152 21.5 No 555 78.5 Morbidity symptoms (n= 152) * Diarrhea 83 54.6 Cough 44 28.9 Fever 25 16.5 Children had eating problem Yes 146 20.7 No 561 79.3 Types of eating problems (n = 146) * Loss of appetite 140 89.2 Swallowing problem 2 1.3 Vomiting 15 9.5 Children had Bitot's spot Yes 4 0.6 No 703 99.4 Vitamin A supplementation Yes 682 96.5 No 25 3.5 * Multiple responses.
The prevalence rate of Bitot's spot in children exceeded the WHO criterion of 0.5%, for declaring vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and Xerophthalmia as a public health problem in the preschool aged group.
[1,2] Bitot's spots reflect the past history of Vitamin A Deficiency (Sommer et al 1980).
Refractory error was found to be present in only nine (4.5%) cases, followed by lacrimation and redness in four (2%), squint in two (1%), and Bitot's spot in two (1%).
% Refractory error 9 4.5 Squint 2 1.0 Bitot's spot 2 1 Lacrimation and redness 4 2 Normal eyes 183 91.5 Total 200 100
The prevalence of Bitot's spot, corneal xerosis, and corneal scar was found to be higher among boys (26%, 1.3%, and 3.9%) than girls (16.4%, 0%, and 1.4%) among school children indicating vitamin A deficiency to be a public health problem [Figure 4].
et al children had night blindness in 35.9%, xerosis conjunctiva in 9.2%, Bitot's spots in 14.2%, nasolabial dyssebacea in 6.8%, angular stomatitis in 6.8%, cheilosis in 8.7% red and raw tongue in 1.6%, pellagrous dermatosis in 13.3%, bleeding gums in 15.2%, ecchymoses in 6.1%, lack of lustre of hair in 26.5%, thinness and sparseness of hair in 24.3%, prevalence of anaemia in children was 34%, 15.9% children had phrynoderma [9] In Rema N et al prevalence of anaemia in boys was 44.08% and in girls was 52.21%, prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in boys was 5.65% and in girls was 8.64%.
The results also highlighted the high prevalence of vitamin "A" deficiency among the malnourished children as indicated by conjunctiva xerosis and bitot's spots. 12 out of 40 male (30%) and 17 out of 60 female (28.3%).
Of those, 1.9% were having both Bitot's Spots and Xerosis, no Corneal Lesions were detected.
Though literature wise vitamin A deficiency is a major problem in many of the developing countries, Bitot's spots was noticed only in 1 child (0.2%).
With regards to measles related complications, 22.5% had acute diarrhea and 12.9% had evidence of bronchopneumonia radiologically and one child developed Bitot's spots and conjunctival xerosis.
[1] The prevalence of Bitot's spots may be highest in school age group but their occurrence may reflect past more than current history of VAD.