bit rate

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bit rate

[′bit ‚rāt]
(communications)
Quantity, per unit time, of binary digits (or pulses representing them) which will pass a given point on a communications line or channel in a continuous stream.

bit rate

(communications, digital signal processing)
(Or "bitrate") A data rate expressed in bits per second. This is a similar to baud but the latter is more applicable to channels with more than two states.

The common units of bit rate are kilobits per second (Kbps) and megabits per second (Mbps). In data rates, the multipliers "k", "M", etc. stand for powers of 1000 not powers of 1024.

The term is also commonly used when discussing digital sampling and sample rates. For example, the MP3 audio compaction algorithm is often set to ouput files with a bitrate of 120 kbps. This means that the file contains an average of 120 kilobits for each second of audio (900 KB per minute). This compares with CD audio which is encoded at 44100 16-bit stereo samples per second or 1408 kbps.

bit rate

(1) See data rate.

(2) The speed that digital audio and video files are encoded (compressed), measured in kilobits (Kb) and megabits (Mb) per second. For example, MP3 audio files can be created with bit rates from 16 Kbps to 320 Kbps, with 128 Kbps being fairly common. Video formats also run the gamut, from as little as 10 Mbps for preview frames to 400 Mbps and higher for HD.

The higher the bit rate, the less compression and the better the audio or video quality. It is sometimes extremely difficult to hear or see the difference unless comparing content with bit rates that are far apart. See space/time.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem of min-bitrate (or min-#) distortion-constrained polygonal approximation can be stated as follows: Approximate the polygonal curve P by another polygonal curve S, so that a total bitrate R(P,[epsilon]) is minimized and the approximation error [E.sub.[infinity] (P,S) does not exceed the given threshold [epsilon]:
The latest version of the H.264 can automatically adjust the bitrate depending on the actual image activity.
Frederick noted that a traditional streaming media deployment can cost $50,000 or more, but the Generic Media Publishing Service gives content producers the ability to store a master file from which streams are transcoded on-the-fly in only the formats and bitrates users request.
In HAS, the number of video quality changes and the playback bitrate are important factors that affect the QoE.
Best Practice: Monitor the maximum peak variable bitrate (VBR) of traffic from the encoder, with notification for significant and fluctuating bursts.
Communications and networking protocols, for instance, need to conform with the timing constraints arising from the frame dependencies introduced by the video encoding and accommodate the video traffic with its bitrate variability.
The proposed system can achieve error free transmission at bitrate of 622 Mbit/s per user with minimal uplink LED power of -5.9 dBm (FEC).
Ability to set minimums and maximums--When you build a fixed bitrate ladder, you choose a minimum rate to deliver--say, 400Kbps--because you want to serve viewers connecting at that bandwidth.
A 50% bitrate saving from H.264 means twice as many HD services using the same bandwidth, or the same number of HD services with approximately double the coverage area.
However, the delay in bitrate switching may cause buffer underflow or sub-optimum Quality-of-Experience (QoE).
Today, with wireless broadband inching closer to ubiquity and smartphone penetration at (http://marketingland.com/report-us-smartphone-penetration-now-75-percent-117746) over 75 percent in the United States, the need to skimp on bytes and audio bitrate have effectively been removed for consumers.