Bitterfeld Electrochemical Combine

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bitterfeld Electrochemical Combine

 

one of the German Democratic Republic’s (GDR) largest chemical enterprises, in the city of Bitterfeld. It originated in 1894. In 1925 it became part of I. G. Farbenindustrie. The development of the energy-consuming production of alkali products by electrolysis in Bitterfeld was favored by the availability there and in nearby areas of large deposits of lignite and substantial reserves of rock salt and potassium salt. During World Wars I and II the combine produced explosives and nonferrous metals. In the years of people’s rule it was converted for peacetime production, was reconstructed, and was substantially expanded. In 1969 there were more than 13,000 people working there. The basic products are inorganic and organic chemicals, solvents, softeners, detergents, toxic chemicals, nitric fertilizers, nonferrous metals and their compounds, and other chemical products intended for use within the country as well as for export. In 1969 the Bitterfeld Electrochemical Combine united with the Wolfen Dye Factory into the Bitterfeld Chemical Combine.

A. M. TELEFUS

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.