Bjørnøya

(redirected from Bjornoya)

Bjørnøya

Bjørnøya (byörnˈöyä), island, 69 sq mi (179 sq km), in the Barents Sea, c.275 mi (440 km) N of Norway; southernmost island of Svalbard. It rises to 1,759 ft (536 m). There are polar fox and polar bear on the island. Probably known to Norsemen in the 12th cent., it was rediscovered by Willem Barentz, the Dutch navigator, in 1596, and was formally annexed by Norway in 1915. It is also known as Bear Island.
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The voyage will go to the volcanic Mohns Ridge between Jan Mayen and Bjornoya, a sea area that is still virtually unexplored.
The seventy-square-mile Bear Island (Bjornoya) is the southernmost of the Svalbards.
Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov thought the treaty should have been "thrown in the trashcan" in the 1940s; that sovereignty over the southernmost island in the archipelago, Bear Island (Bjornoya), more properly (that is, historically) belonged to Russia anyway, and that a Russo-Norwegian condominium should administer the remainder.
5), as well as stations on Jan Mayen and Bjornoya, and on Hopen and elsewhere on Svalbard.
The first well will be on the Skrugard block, between Bjornoya and the Snohvit fields, to be drilled with the semi-submersible drilling rig Polar Pioneer.
Both the Luftwaffe and the German navy began training men, designing and establishing weather stations, both manned and automatic, in the North Atlantic, on the east coast of Greenland, Spitsbergen, Zemlya Frantsa Iosifa, Hopen and Bjornoya Islands and Labrador.
Intraspecific variation in trophic feeding levels and organochlorine concentrations in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Bjornoya, the Barents Sea.
Hjelsoy and Bjornoya, the main common guillemot breeding areas in Norway, experienced a dramatic decline in both colonies due to the overfishing of capelin in the Barents Sea in 1985 and 1986.
Traveling in a former sealing ship, the Terningen, they camped on Bjornoya (Bear Island), because it had an "enormous population of sea-birds, especially Guillemots," on 13-23 June 1921; on Prins Karls Forland, off the west coast of Spitsbergen north of Isfjord, on 30 June-10 July; and near the great Nordenskjold Glacier at the head of Klaas-Billen Bay on 19 July-16 August.
The exploration zone lies 190 kilometres offshore Norway, between the Snohvit field and the Arctic island of Bjornoya.
In Bjornoya, Svalbard, the number of breeding pairs (from 1986), adult survival, and breeding success are monitored annually by the Norwegian Polar Institute.