Bjørnson, Bjørnstjerne Martinius

(redirected from Bjornstjerne Bjornson)

Bjørnson, Bjørnstjerne Martinius

 

Born Dec. 8, 1832, in Kvikne; died Apr. 26, 1910, in Paris. Norwegian writer, prominent in the theater and in public affairs.

Bjørnson fought for the national independence of Norway and against militarism. When he was the director of the Norwegian Theater in Bergen from 1857 to 1858 and of the Christiania Theater from 1865 to 1867, he tried to establish a national repertory. Bjørnson’s early work was romantic. The work of this period includes the historical dramas Between the Battles, 1858; King Sverre, 1861; Mary Stuart in Scotland, 1864; the two-part series Sigurd the Bad, 1862, and Sigurd the Crusader, 1872; and the tales from peasant life Synnøve Solbakken, 1857; and The Fisher Lassie, 1868. Bjørnson sharply criticized bourgeois reality in the realistic social dramas The Bankruptcy, 1875; The New System, 1878; The Editor, 1875; and the two-play work Beyond Our Power, 1883-95. In his later work Bjørnson contradicted himself in his solutions of social and ethical problems; he considered the vices of bourgeois society a deviation from the norm, as for instance, in The Heritage of the Kurts (1884; Russian translation, Novye veianiia, 1893) and In the Ways of God, 1889. Bjørnson’s plays were staged in Russia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903.

WORKS

Samlede digter verker, vols. 1-9. Oslo-Copenhagen, 1919-20.
Samlede verker, vols. 1-13. Oslo, 1932-33.
In Russian translation:
Poln. sobr. soch., vols. 1-2. Kiev-Kharkov, 1893-97.
Sobr. soch., vols. 1-7. Moscow, 1910-1914.
Izbrannoe. Moscow, 1959.

REFERENCES

Brandes, G. “B. B’ernson.” Sobr. soch., vol. 1. St. Petersburg, 1909.
Mering, F. “B’ernson.” In his book Literaturno-kriticheskie stat’i, vol. 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1934.
Neustroev, V. P. “Rytsar’ mira i demokratii.” Inostrannaia literatura, 1960, no. 4.
Bjørnson, Bjørn. B. Bjørnson. Oslo, 1932.
Mjøen, A. Erindringer om B. Bjørnson. Oslo, 1951.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nordraak composed Norway's national anthem, "Ja, vi elsker dette landet" (Yes, We Love this Country), with text by his cousin Bjornstjerne Bjornson.
But mixed in with all those are plenty of Jorgensens, Petters, and Nilsens, in addition to Norwegian classic works by Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Camilla Collett, and the requisite Henrik Ibsen.
He is even more put out because the bust of Bjornstjerne Bjornson (1832-1910) has arrived and now seems to be the only one that represents Denmark.
Volume I begins stunningly, with the immediately arresting (and eerie) "Twilight Fancies", the poetry by the great Norwegian writer Bjornstjerne Bjornson, who contributes most of the texts for these Seven Songs from the Norwegian.
There were no takers for Hamsun's first literacy efforts, socially realistic tales of peasant life imitative of the great Bjornstjerne Bjornson (whose pioneering efforts in the 19th century to create a national Norwegian literature would earn him the Nobel Prize in 1903).
The perception of France as impotent to exercise much influence abroad was not helped by a contemporary critique of French mentalities by Bjornstjerne Bjornson, with which Zola and the bourgeois newspaper-reading public were acutely familiar.
Du skal hade og foragte alle bonder, saasom: Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Kristo-fer Kristo-fersen og Kolbenstvedt' ('You shall hate and resent all farmers, such as: Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Kristooo-fer Kristooo-fersen and Kolbenstvedt');
Grieg was fully aware of the play's moral implications when he agreed to write the incidental music in 1874, and as he explained in a letter to Bjornstjerne Bjornson (1832-1910) that same year: "I can only marvel at how it [the play] is filled with witticism and invective from beginning to end.
Screenplay, Siri Senje, based on the novel "The Fisherman's Daughter" (Fiskerjenten) by Bjornstjerne Bjornson.
Brandes befriended and championed such important writers as Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Henrik Ibsen, Jens Peter Jacobsen, Jonas Lie, Alexander Kielland, and August Strindberg, and he became a principal leader of the naturalistic movement in Scandinavian literature.
These lines, as I remember from one of Bjornstjerne Bjornson poems, and from a rural story of his that I read as a child, have always been the guidelines of my life.
She had an immense influence on later writers such as Henrik Ibsen, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Jonas Lie, and Alexander Kielland.