Black Death, the

Black Death, the

plague whose unprecedented mortality was incomprehensible to medieval mind. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 379–382]
See: Horror
References in periodicals archive ?
The great mortality; an intimate history of the Black Death, the most devastating plague of all time.
He claims that in an effort to preserve the existing distribution of powers within society in the face of the Black Death, the upper orders formed a cohesive government in order to hold the upper and lower orders to their respective obligations (p.
This, for Thirsk, is what constitutes alternative agriculture, and she sees it as flourishing during the century after the Black Death, the century after 1650, the so-called late Victorian agricultural depression, and at the end of the twentieth century.
In his short, sweeping essay on the Black Death, the late David Herlihy engages with these issues in a fresh and original way.
Students of plague history, whether it be from a social or a medical perspective, receive a hard-hitting history which stands out from other studies on the subject in John Kelly's THE GREAT MORTALITY: AN INTIMATE HISTORY OF THE BLACK DEATH, THE MOST DEVASTATING PLAGUE OF ALL TIME (0060006927 $25.95) .
Three examples suffice: 'As the population declined, the character of medieval society began to change' or 'in the fifty years after the Black Death, the medieval world's traditional economic winners and losers exchanged places' or 'women were also significant economic winners in the new social order'.
There had been a slight miscalculation of the energy requirements for the Black Death, the pair realized.
Science and technology in world history; v.3: The black death, the Renaissance, the Reformation and the scientific revolution.
Physical infirmities greatly raised the risk of dying for Danes unexposed to the Black Death, the scientists report in the Feb.