Black English


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Related to Black English: Ebonics

Black English,

distinctive dialectdialect,
variety of a language used by a group of speakers within a particular speech community. Every individual speaks a variety of his language, termed an idiolect. Dialects are groups of idiolects with a common core of similarities in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary.
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 spoken at times by as many as 80% to 90% of African Americans; also called ebonics [from ebony and phonics]. Long considered merely substandard English, it is in fact a distinct form. African slaves confronting white culture, and themselves speaking many different languages, developed a pidginpidgin
, a lingua franca that is not the mother tongue of anyone using it and that has a simplified grammar and a restricted, often polyglot vocabulary. The earliest documented pidgin is the Lingua Franca (or Sabir) that developed among merchants and traders in the Mediterranean
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, mixing for the most part English vocabulary and African syntax, that developed into Black English. Much that seems grammatically incorrect actually represents consistent application of African structural principles. A social, rather than regional, dialect, it is similar in all parts of the United States, as research since the 1960s has shown. Its role in public education is a source of controversy because its effect on the process of learning to read and write is not clearly understood. In addition, its exclusive use by individuals has usually limited their opportunities for social advancement. See also GullahGullah
, a creole language formerly spoken by the Gullah, an African-American community of the Sea Islands and the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States. The word is probably a corruption of the African Gola or Gora,
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.

Bibliography

See J. McWhorter, Talking Back, Talking Black (2017).

References in periodicals archive ?
(1992) "Some African-American perspectives on Black English Vernacular".
So what I did, then, was I took the whole idea of using black English and dealing with it in an urban setting, incorporating the hipness that was in that black urban setting, which means that the English is going to change, right?
Throughout the 1960's and on into the 1990's, although the appellations "Vernacular Black English", "Black Vernacular English", "Black English Vernacular" and more recently "African American Vernacular English" have gained some popularity, the most prevalent phrase used is "Black English".
The notion of linguistic camouflage dates at least to Spears ("Black English"), who credits influence (though not use of the term "camouflage") to Bickerton.
"If Black English isn't a Language, then Tell Me, What Is?" The Black Scholar Studies and Research, v.
What caused me to use Black English? It came from reading Sterling Brown.
South African black English writing in the hands of the group of writers sharing their more radical social commentary approach with earlier 1950s writers associated with Es'kia Mphahlele carry forward the taxonomical features of this component of South African literature even in the post-apartheid era.
Adding insult to injury, when discussing the use of Black English in the ghetto, he used a created term "ghettoglish " instead of relying on the history of African American Vernacular English that has been developed for years.
RICKFORD, John Russell and Russell John Rickford 2000: Spoken Soul: The Story of Black English. New York: Wiley.
The donor was a 24-year-old black English citizen, Dean Anderson, whose brain death occurred in the yzmir Medical Park Hospital after undergoing treatment in an intensive care unit for six days.
When Preece leads Welsh Premier outfit Airbus UK into the Europa League, he will become the first black English manager to coach in European combat.
When Preece leads Welsh Premier League outfit Airbus UK into the Europa League, he will be the first black English manager to lead a team into continental combat having steered them to European qualification.