Black hole of Calcutta


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Related to Black hole of Calcutta: Robert Clive

Kolkata

Kolkata (kôlkŭtˈə), formerly Calcutta (kălkŭtˈə), city (1991 pop. 10,916,272), capital of West Bengal state, E India, on the Hugli River. It is the second largest city in India and one of the largest in the world. Ten of Kolkata's suburbs—Haora, South Suburban City, Bhatpara, South Dum Dum, Kamarhati, Garden Reach, Panihati, Baranagar, Hugli-Chinsura, and Serampore—have well over 100,000 people each. The area of the Kolkata metropolitan area is 228.5 sq mi (591 sq km), extending more than 40 miles along the Hugli. Kolkata is the major seaport (see Haldia) and industrial center of E India; jute is milled, and textiles, chemicals, paper, and metal products are manufactured. Bengali, Hindi, and Urdu are the main languages. The city has terrible poverty, chronic unemployment, overcrowding, inadequate transportation, and resultant social unrest.

Kolkata was founded c.1690 as Calcutta by the British East India Company. In 1756 the nawab of Bengal, Siraj-ud-Daula, captured Kolkata and killed most of its garrison by imprisoning it overnight in a small, stifling room, known as the notorious “Black Hole.” Robert Clive retook the city in 1757. From 1833 to 1912, the city was the capital of British India.

The Univ. of Calcutta (founded 1857), Jadavpur Univ., and the Indian Museum, which houses one of the world's outstanding natural history collections, are in the city. The Maidan, a large river-front park, is Kolkata's most attractive section. A subway through the central section of the city opened in 1986. The city was officially renamed Kolkata (its name in Bengali) in 2001.

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Black Hole of Calcutta

Indian dungeon in which overcrowding suffocated prisoners. [Br. Hist.: Harbottle, 45–46]

Black hole of Calcutta

146 Britishers imprisoned in small, stifling room (1756). [Br. Hist.: Harbottle, 45–46]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
One gets the feeling that Clinton has reserved the DOE as the darkened corner (or, as one attorney who works closely with the department calls it, "the Black Hole of Calcutta") into which he shuffles his least impressive, quota-satisfying Cabinet members.
on this day 1756: Night of the Black Hole Of Calcutta. Some 146 English prisoners were put into a cell measuring 18ft by 14ft on a hot June evening when the Nawab of Bengal captured Fort William.
Meanwhile, the 60 infants were being taught as usual in the old school in West Street, built in 1905 and nicknamed The Black Hole of Calcutta. The new school was due to be completed by Christmas at a cost of PS25,000 and would include a gym, music rooms, and playing fields.
1756: Night of the Black Hole Of Calcutta: 146 English prisoners were put in a cell 18ft by 14ft on a hot June evening when the Nawab of Bengal captured Fort William.
Like the morning Robson called him into that pokey office nicknamed the Black Hole of Calcutta because it was tucked in the shadow of the girders propping up the main stand.
True, the grandstand is no longer state-of-the-art - and in some respects is just a bit of a state - but it copes well enough, apart from on Gold Cup day, which, when it rains, turns the old edifice into a gruesome cross between the black hole of Calcutta and the first day of the Harrods sale.
1756: During the Anglo-French struggle for India, 145 British men and one woman were put in a cell less than 18 feet square, known as the Black Hole of Calcutta. 23 survived.
It was referred to in the Law Association Gazette as "Cork's Black Hole of Calcutta" and it was also called the solicitors' "garden centre".
No one is asking Hollywood to churn out an undifferentiated string of uplifting biographies, say, Mother Teresa: The Black Hole of Calcutta. But it's jarring, and somewhat frightening, to see the cheerful moral flatness of one screen couple and family after another.
1756: During the Anglo-French struggle for India, 145 British men and one woman were captured and put in a cell less than 18ft square, known as the Black Hole of Calcutta. Only 23 survived.
Nobody had to queue for an hour to get into the Black Hole of Calcutta and you shouldn't have to do so on Town Moor.