Black Manta


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Aquaman vol. 1 #42 © 1968 DC Comics. COVER ART BY NICK CARDY.

Black Manta

(pop culture)
The first recorded clash between DC Comics' Sea King and the enigmatic Black Manta occurred in Aquaman vol. 1 #35 (1967). In “Between Two Dooms!” by writer Bob Haney and artist Nick Cardy, the domed, undersea city of Atlantis is endangered by a terrorist clad in a black wetsuit and a silver breathing helmet with glowing visors that resemble fish eyes. This mysterious malefactor's true identity is unknown, but Aquaman intimates at least one previous encounter by identifying him as “my old enemy … Black Manta!” Commanding a school of aggressive mutant Manta-Men that project crackling stun blasts with each flap of their wings, Black Manta, piloting a laser-firing Manta-Ship, makes Atlantis uninhabitable for its water-breathing denizens and kidnaps the Sea King's son “Aquababy” to lure Aquaman into surrendering. As Black Manta draws bead on his nemesis, ready to harpoon him to death, the arrival of another Aqua-foe, the Ocean Master, distracts Manta, allowing Aquaman to save the day. A scant ten weeks later, after the June 29, 1967, on-sale date of Aquaman #35, Black Manta returned, courtesy of the same writer, Bob Haney, but in a different medium: animated television. The premiere Aquaman episode of Filmation's The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure, “Menace of the Black Manta” (original airdate: September 9, 1967), featured the villain (in a slightly altered uniform of blue and purple), as well as his Manta-Ship and Manta-Men. Voiced by Ted Knight, also the cartoon's narrator (who later became famous as befuddled newsman Ted Baxter on The Mary Tyler Moore Show), Black Manta appeared in four additional TV episodes. Black Manta's near-contemporaneous comic and cartoon debuts suggest that Haney and the Aquaman comic's editor George Kashdan, who also wrote episodes of the TV series, may have co-created the villain for television but absorbed him into the sponge of comicbook continuity. Black Manta has since been a consistent foe in Aquaman's comic, often battling the Sea King with high-tech weapons. The depth of Black Manta's hatred of the Sea King was explored by writer David Michelinie and artist Jim Aparo in Adventure Comics #452 and Aquaman #57 (both 1977). Aquababy (by this point more commonly called “Arthur, Jr.,” Arthur Curry being Aquaman's real name) was once again in the evildoer's clutches, Manta forcing Aquaman and his sidekick Aqualad into a gladiator-style brawl to spare the child. Aquababy nonetheless perished, a tragedy that haunts the Sea King to this day. The other surprise of this two-part shocker was the disclosure of Black Manta's face: he was revealed to be black— a rarity for comics of the day—becoming DC Comics' second African-American supervillain (after Batman foe Black Spider, who premiered in 1976). Black Manta soon returned to television animation as one of the Legion of Doom in ABC's Challenge of the Super Friends (1978–1979), with Ted Cassidy (Lurch of The Addams Family) portraying the character. In subsequent years, Black Manta disappeared and reappeared with the ebb and flow of Aquaman's publication (the title has a long history of cancellations and revivals). A particularly brutal clash between the subsea adversaries transpired in an early 1990s revival, in which Manta nearly gored Aquaman to death. In 1995 Manta sold his soul to the demon Neron and was transmogrified into a gruesome manta-creature, temporarily hiding his affliction inside his classic costume. He briefly became a drug smuggler in the Kevin Smith–scripted Green Arrow vol. 3 #3–#4 (2001). In a 2003–2004 Aquaman story arc, Aquaman magnanimously used his mystical water-based Healing Hand (bestowed to him by the Lady of the Lake) to restore Black Manta's humanity; Manta returned Aquaman's kindness by continuing his war against the Sea King, resuming his sinister machinations in 2005 by undergoing water-breathing gene therapy in an effort to become an even greater threat. Black Manta's popularity in comics and on TV has translated to the collectibles shelves: in the 2000s, he has appeared as Hero Clix gaming miniatures, a Super Friends action figure, a DC Pocket Superheroes figure, and an Alex Ross–designed action figure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the 19 Philippine teams participating in the two-day event are Speed Devilz from Manila; Black Manta Warriors of Cebu City; Umagu Dragon Boat Team and Bugsok Metro Dumaguete Paddlers from Dumaguete City; Waray Bugsay from Tacloban City; Boracay Dragon Force; Samal Dragons, and Pearl Farm Paddlers from Samal Island.
Anthony Mackie (Falcon, Captain America) and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (Black Manta, Aquaman) are the two protagonists, estranged friends, who play a VR open-world fighting game called Striking Vipers.
No plot details have been released yet, but (https://www.ibtimes.com/aquaman-post-credits-scene-how-it-sets-sequel-2744505) the post-credits scene made it clear that Black Manta would return eventually.
Also expected to make comebacks areAmber Heardas Mera,Patrick Wilsonas Aquaman's brother Orm,Nicole Kidmanas Queen Atlanna,Willem Dafoeas Nuidis Vulko,Dolph Lundgrenas King Nereus, and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as Black Manta.
However, Orm is flanked by a vast army led by pirate Black Manta (Yahya Abdul-Manteen II).
However, Orm is flanked by a vast army led by grief-stricken pirate Black Manta (Yahya Abdul-Manteen II).
Yahya Abdul-Mateen II is also poorly served as a not-so-super villain called Black Manta. His ruthless high-seas mercenary is a great example of how the film spends an unnecessary amount of time looking ahead to the next adventure.
A battle against nautical pirates at the film's opening turns out to have a lasting negative effect: One of the vanquished eventually becomes sworn enemy Black Manta (Yahya Abdul-Mateen).
However, Orm is flanked by a vast army including an elite squadron of plasma gun-wielding soldiers led by grief-stricken pirate Black Manta (Yahya Abdul-Manteen II).
The film also stars Amber Heard as Mera, a fierce warrior and Aquaman's ally throughout his journey Oscar nominee Willem Dafoe ("The Florida Project") as Vulko, counsel to the Atlantean throne Patrick Wilson as Orm, the present King of Atlantis Dolph Lundgren as Nereus, King of the Atlantean tribe Xebel Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as the revenge-seeking Black Manta and Oscar winner Nicole Kidman ("The Hours") as Arthur's mom, Atlanna.
There was a second preview for the Christmas release that unveiled Aquaman's nemesis, Black Manta, as well as more underwater action, a rooftop chase and a final view of the Momoa in his superhero threads.
Show creator Charlie Brooker recently teased an unlikely Marvel-DC crossover in one of the episodes and Entertainment Weekly released an exclusive first look featuring Anthony Mackie (The Falcon from Marvel Universe) and DC's Aquaman actor Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (Black Manta).