Black-Bellied Plover

Black-Bellied Plover

 

(Squatarola squatarola), a bird of the family Charadriidae of the suborder Limicolae. The black-bellied plover is about 28 cm long and weighs 170–225 g. In contrast to other closely related species, the black-bellied plover has a small posterior toe. During the summer the plumage is variegated above and black below and on the axillary wings. The winter plumage is off-white. The black-bellied plover has circumpolar distribution in the tundra zone. A migratory bird, it winters in Africa, Southern Asia, Australia, and Central and South America. The bird nests on dry ridges in pure tundra. A clutch contains four or, less commonly, three eggs, which are incubated by both the male and the female for 23 days. Both sexes rear the young. The diet consists of insects, worms, mollusks, crustaceans, and seeds.

References in periodicals archive ?
Foraging behavior of black-bellied plover (Pluvialis squatarola).
For example, black-bellied plovers (Pluvialis squatarola) exhibit a stereotypical foraging strategy (Baker, 1974), whereas willets (Catoptrohorus semipalmatus) are more versatile.
Look for whimbrel, long-billed curlew, black-bellied plover, Pacific golden plover, greater yellowlegs, ruddy turnstone or long- and short-billed dowitcher - species that are many times seen only at this time of year for a period of a few weeks.
3 -- 6 -- color) The aquarium's 1,200-square-foot wetlands exhibit is home to a variety of shorebird species, including, from far left, a pair of ruddy ducks, a black-bellied plover, a snowy plover and a killdeer, below.
square-foot wetlands exhibit include two black-bellied plovers, a western snowy plover, a killdeer and two ruddy ducks.
Most common names and taxonomy follow the American Ornithologists' Union, but there are exceptions, including the use of the common name Gray Plover for Black-bellied Plover (Pluvials squatarola) and the split of Stephen's (Mexican) Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus arizonae) from Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferUS).
and crabs, and black-bellied plover ate bivalves and gasteropods, especially Bulla gouldiana.
Shallow water Exposed mudflat Water/mudflat American Avocet* Black-bellied Plover Willet Greater Yellowlegs Snowy Plover* Long-billed Curlew Lesser Yellowlegs Semipalmated Plover* Marbled Godwit Stilt Sandpiper* Piping Plover* Western Sandpiper Sanderling Dunlin Killdeer* Dowitchers Ruddy Turnstone* Least Sandpiper
The lower river near Long Beach features significant migrant species, including the western sandpiper, least sandpiper, black-necked stilt, long-billed dowitcher, semipalmated plover and black-bellied plover.
Fishermen with a good sense of curiosity can encounter and enjoy many other unique shorebirds, as well, including oyster catchers, black-bellied plovers, short-billed and long-billed dowitchers, red knots, Hudsonian godwits, whimbrels, white-rumped sandpipers, phalaropes, willets and lesser yellowlegs.
The north central coast of Brazil is the most important wintering area in South America for roseate spoonbills, black-bellied plovers, ruddy turnstones, whimbrels, and willets, and is also critical fez sanderlings, semipalmated sandpipers, short-billed dowitchers, and red knots.
The beaches and the bay-shores attract a variety of overwintering shorebirds, including long-billed curlews, marbled god-wits, black-bellied plovers, whimbrels, and willets.