impala

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impala

impala, species of antelope, Aepyceros melampus, found in the savannah and bush country of E and S Africa. It is the antelope most commonly depicted in illustrations and in motion pictures. It is about 3 ft (90 cm) high at the shoulder, with a coat of rich, reddish brown, shading to whitish on the underparts. The horns, borne only by the male, are long and curved in the shape of a lyre. Impalas are the most powerful jumpers of all antelopes; they can leap 10 ft (3 m) into the air and travel 30 ft (9 m) in a single bound. Impalas live in herds, sometimes numbering several hundred individuals; they feed on grasses and shrubs and always stay fairly near water. They are often found in association with herds of other animals, such as zebras and gnus, and are still fairly numerous over most of their range. The impala, which is no longer considered to be closely related to the gazelles, is classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Bovidae.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Impala

 

(Aepyceros melampus), an artiodactyl mammal of the family Bovidae. The body length is 1.1–1.8 m; the height at the shoulder is 77–100 cm; the tail length is 25–40 cm; and the weight is 40–90 kg. The males have lyrate horns reaching 75 mm in length; the females are hornless. The coloration is brownish red above. The underside of the body and the tail are white. The impala is found in the savannas and cleared forest areas of central and southern Africa. The animal lives in groups of 20 to 25 individuals.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

impala

an antelope, Aepyceros melampus, of southern and eastern Africa, having lyre-shaped horns and able to move with enormous leaps when disturbed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005