bladderwort

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bladderwort

(blăd`ərwûrt', –wôrt'), any plant of the genus Utricularia, insectivorous or carnivorous aquatic plants, many native to North America. Small animals are caught and digested in bladderlike organs of the finely divided submerged leaves. Bladderworts and similar related genera are an important element of aquatic and marsh flora on all continents. They are sometimes grown in aquariums as curiosities. Bladderworts are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Scrophulariales, family Lentibulariaceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bladderwort is an eccentric and complicated plant.
This surprisingly rich history of duplication, paired with the current small size of the bladderwort genome, is further evidence that the plant has been prolific at deleting nonessential DNA, but at the same time maintaining a functional set of genes similar to those of other plant species" says Herrera-Estrella.
The bladderwort is a complicated plant, which lives in aquatic habitats such as freshwater wetlands, and has developed corresponding, highly specialized hunting methods.
Bladderworts eat small bugs, such as one-eyed Cyclops, tiny crustaceans that live in the water.
Bladderworts have small, urn-shaped bladders that trap insects and crustaceans.
Carnivorous bladderworts suck up prey," Science News, February 16.
If you were hiking and came across a plant called a bladderwort, you might stop to admire its small, yellow flowers floating on a puddle.
That's because the bladderwort is one of the fastest bug-eating plants on the planet.
Bladderworts sport trapdoors that collapse inward with a tiny nudge, creating a whirlpool that sucks in wee critters--all in about half a millisecond.
Tiny traps, often no wider than an ant is long, dot the surface of bladderworts.
Bladderworts move fluid so well, he says, that they could inspire new lab tools.