Blake

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Blake

1. Sir Peter. born 1932, British painter, a leading exponent of pop art in the 1960s: co-founder of the Brotherhood of Ruralists (1969)
2. Quentin (Saxby). born 1932, British artist, illustrator, and children's writer; noted esp for his illustrations to books by Roald Dahl
3. Robert. 1599--1657, English admiral, who commanded Cromwell's fleet against the Royalists, the Dutch, and the Spanish
4. William. 1757--1827, English poet, painter, engraver, and mystic. His literary works include Songs of Innocence (1789) and Songs of Experience (1794), The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1793), and Jerusalem (1820). His chief works in the visual arts include engravings of a visionary nature, such as the illustrations for The Book of Job (1826), for Dante's poems, and for his own Prophetic Books (1783--1804)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Two decades ago, in 1982, Studies in Romanticism published a special issue on Blake that turned the prophetic trope on its head.
Because 2002 marks not only the twentieth anniversary of that remarkable issue of SiR, but also the tenth anniversary of the conception of the electronic William Blake Archive, (5) a project that for some has come to iconify the future of Blake studies, I asked its editors--Morris Eaves, Robert N.
But sadly for Blake fans, the other bloke gets the glory and right now we're in the middle of another Sherlock series starring Benedict Cumberbatch, who doesn't look a bit like Basil Rathbone, who really did look like the famous Sidney Paget drawings of Britain's second-best sleuth.
Blake's spectacular career began on December 20, 1893, in the Christmas edition of the Halfpenny Marvel when he solved the Mystery of the Missing Millionaire.
Betty Blake says she is just as impressed with her son's eloquence and poise as she is with his tennis game.
Bentley, Jr.'s Blake Records (henceforth BR) had when it first appeared in 1969.
The buildings in this watercolour are those of what the poet William Hayley called the 'marine village' of Felpham on the Sussex coast, where Hayley lived, and where Blake and his wife Catherine came to reside under his auspices for a period of three years between 1800 and 1803.
On Thursday night, Blake said goodbye to Lisa and to Sam, he said that he loved her and got down on his knee and asked her to marry him.
Since Mee focuses chiefly on what the conflict between Blake and the Hunts says about enthusiasm, I want to revisit this contentious relationship in light of an unrecorded reference to Blake by Leigh Hunt in the short lived quarterly The Reflector (1810/11--12), which is not found in Bentley's Blake Records.
Collectively, the essays conjure up Blake's world from his surroundings to his working materials, to the afterlife of his works and the lives of his collectors, students, and enthusiasts.
Yet Blake's graphic art is by no means found only in his `Illuminated Books'.