bleed air


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bleed air

Compressed air bled from gas turbine engines. It can be used in an aircraft pressurization system, cabin temperature control, and deicing and anti-icing systems, as well as for boundary-layer control.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company is under contract with KAI to provide the fighter's complete environmental control system-including air conditioning, bleed air control and cabin pressurization and liquid cooling-along with the aircraft's air turbine starter and flow control valve.
Combined Synopsis/Solicitation: Provision of Duct Bleed air 05f
APUs are gas turbine engines providing bleed air for cabin air conditioning, main engine start capability, electrical power and in-flight backup power.
Figure 4 shows the typical location of the electrical, bleed air and fre-wire system components on the front spar and leading edge D-nose.
This company, engaged in the design, manufacturing and sale of vapor cycle air conditioning, bleed air control and cabin pressure systems as well as related equipment and components, will become a new division of the Aircraft Systems segment.
Shortly afterwards, the light went out (because the bleed air had melted pitot-static lines in the cabin and induced a malfunction).
Now came the moment of truth: as I placed the condition lever to "Run," and toggled the switch to start the starboard engine, we received a starter-control indication, right bleed air advisory light, fuel flow and light off, but no rpm indication.
However, performance studies done by FRDC engineer Bob Abernethy showed that for a J58 application requiring continuous high Mach number afterburner operation, ducting compressor bleed air directly into the afterburner not only eliminated the stall margin limits, but it also provided better engine performance.
Other changes include upgrades to the flight deck displays, an electronic bleed air system and fly-by-wire spoiler flight controls.
A mixing valve in the environmental conditioning system had failed wide open and was venting 600-degree C bleed air from the engine, along with smoke and fumes.
That said, using heated bleed air from their turbine engines is a popular and effective solution for many jets and turboprops.
The three worst offenders are windshield bleed air (for aircraft such as the CJ1-3 lacking an electrically heated windshield), "wind" noise increasing as a function of indicated airspeed and environmental system (duct and fan) noise.