blending inheritance

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blending inheritance

[′blen·diŋ in′her·ə·təns]
(genetics)
Inheritance in which the character of the offspring is a blend of those in the parents; a common feature for quantitative characters, such as stature, determined by large numbers of genes and affected by environmental variation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The Blending Theory, enabling a view of a literary text as a complex blend, is a research tool, originating from the cognitive approach to language and, by extension, also to literature.
Blending theory purports to trace with unprecedented rigor the modes in and by which the human mind may creatively combine conceptual material, through the blending of mental "spaces," to form novel ideational hybrids.
Blending theory with practice, it offers a unique opportunity to a select group of students to meet some of America's top investment bankers and traders.
Sandy Frank's THE INNER GAME OF SCREENWRITING (9781615930616, $18.95) covers the underlying basics of what makes a screenplay or movie great, blending theory with assessments of screenwriting's less obvious challenges.
It's a key guide to learning this low-level language, blending theory with application tips and discussing everything from constants to input routines and stack references.
Orton demonstrates how blending theory, a development of cognitive metaphor theory much in vogue in mythological study in Scandinavia, can illuminate the central metaphor of poetic composition in Old Norse.
The first is to use conceptual blending theory to help us understand the way characters and narrators sometimes think.
The second essay in this section, by Nicolas Moschovakis, the first essay so far not to engage with emotion, proposes a "cognitive account of topicality." Using Titus Andronicus as his main text, Moschovakis suggests a description of topical allusion in terms of conceptual blending theory. His main theoretical point is that by treating topical allusion as a conceptual blend we stand to gain better understanding of both character and historical reader/spectator reception.
As a cognitivist, I analyze my account in terms of conceptual blending theory. We stand to gain, I argue, by understanding topical identifications wherever they may emerge--in an author's mind, an actor's, or those of audiences and/or later critics--as conceptual blends.
The need to introduce intermediate spaces in the primitive two-domain model of human cognition designed by the theory of conceptual metaphor in order to perform blending analysis, together with the detailed description of the many cognitive moves identified in the creation of the blend, has made the theory expand into more comprehensive versions which are able to provide for all the variations encountered; the most recent development is the conceptual integration network model (Fauconnier and Turner 1998, 2001), which actually derives from the former blending theory (Fauconnier and Turner 1994).