Beatitudes

(redirected from Blessed are the meek)

Beatitudes

(bē-ăt`ĭto͞odz') [Lat.,=blessing], in the Gospel of St. Matthew, eight blessings uttered by Jesus at the opening of the Sermon on the Mount. Some, counting verses differently, say there are nine. In a parallel passage in the Gospel of St. Luke, only four of the blessings appear, with four corresponding woes.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Beatitudes

 

New Testament precepts of moral and social character ascribed to Jesus Christ by Christian tradition and invested with divine authority (The Sermon on the Mount in Matthew, ch. 5, and Luke, ch. 6). They define which people may hope for beatification because of their social and moral condition (“Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven”). They also call on those in want to be humble and submissive (“Do not resist one who is evil”). Societies with antagonistic class conditions use the Beatitudes to strengthen the system based on exploitation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Blessed are the meek, blessed are the poor, blessed are those who strive for righteousness sake.
Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the land.
3) Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.
Blessed are the meek, for they shall possess the earth.
Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
The Beatitudes are all familiar to us as sayings, the best known being blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.
"Blessed are the meek," Jesus says, "the land is their inheritance." But what if our houses sit squat on that land right now, while our arrogance and disdain is felt by those renters at the four-plex across the street?
and 'magical simplicity of phrase' imposed itself on all later versions down to the present day." He was responsible for such familiar expressions as "a man after his own heart," "the Lord's anointed," and "Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth." Ultimately his diction became 'the consecrated dialect of English speech.'"
Christ's beatitudes, declarations of what is blessed, said: "Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the Kingdom of God," and "Blessed are the meek for they will inherit the earth."
In today's society, said Dr Carey, such beatitudes as "blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the Kingdom of God" and "blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the Earth" were no longer accepted.
As the train enters Wellington, Miller concludes his banal and condescending reflections on the "race problem" with the "consoling" thought that "blessed are the meek .
Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of Heaven; Blessed are the meek for they shall be comforted.