Blind Tillage

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Blind Tillage

 

the first shallow loosening of the interrow spaces of sugar beets. The soil is tilled when sprouting occurs and distinctive rows have appeared. Blind tillage is done at a depth of 4–5 cm by tractor cultivators. Its purpose is to kill weeds, break up the soil crust, reduce evaporation, and ensure an influx of air to the roots. It is especially effective on wet clayey soils in regions having cold protracted springs. The yield of root crops is significantly reduced if blind tillage is done too late. Harrowing the fields before and after the appearance of sprouts is often substituted for blind tillage.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.